School, exams and… BSD!

Alright, January is already almost over, so there’s not much use in wishing my readers a happy new year, right? I wanted to have this month’s blog post out much earlier and in fact wanted to write about a completely different topic. But after January 27th it was pretty obvious for me what I’d have to write about – On that day I passed my final exam and now I’m a Computer Science Expert by profession. Time to take a look back at the apprenticeship and the status of *nix in German IT training today.

Spoiler: It’s Microsoft, Microsoft and again Microsoft. Only then there’s one drop of Linux in the ocean. I had left the (overly colorful) world of Windows in 2008. When I started the apprenticeship I was determined not to eat humble pie and come crawling back to that. While it was at times a rather tough fight, it was possible to do. And I’m documenting it here because I want to encourage other people to also take this path. The more people take the challenge the easier it will become for everyone. Besides: It is absolutely necessary to blaze the trail for better technology to actually arrive in mainstream business. This is of great importance if we do not want to totally fall behind.

Detours

I didn’t take the straight way into IT. While I had been hooked with computers since I was a little child, I also found that I had a passion to explain things to others. I gave private lessons after school for many years and after passing the Abitur (think of the British A levels) I chose to go to the university to become a teacher.

It took me a very long time of struggle to accept that I could not actually do that for a living. I am in fundamental opposition to how the German school system is being ruined and I could not spend all my work life faithfully serving an employer that I have not even the least bit of respect for.

The situation is as follows: We once had a school system in Germany that aimed at educating young people to be fit for whatever their life holds. The result was people who could stand on their own feet. Today the opposite is true: A lot of people who leave school have no idea how to find their way in life. Playing computer games is the only thing that a lot of young men (and an increasing number of women) actually do. They have not developed any character, they have no passion for anything (and thus no goals in life) and they often haven’t learned no empathy at all (and thus keep hurting other people – not even because of bad will but because of total ignorance).

At the same time things taught in school aim purely at making people available as workmen as soon as possible. Sounds contradictory? Sure thing. At the university I enjoyed the benefits of the old system where there was relatively large academic freedom and you were encouraged to take your time to learn things properly, to do some research if you hit topics of interest to you and to take courses from other faculties, etc. And this is pure insanity: All that is largely gone. New students are forced to hasten through their studies thanks to tight requirements (which semester to take which course in – very schoolish, no freedom at all)… In the name of “comparability” we did away with our own academic degrees only to adopt the inferior “master” (as well as the even more inferior “bachelor”).

Secondary schools are lowering their standards further and further so that almost anybody can get their A levels and flood the universities. At the same time there are not enough people remaining for other paths of education – and those who are far too often are completely useless to the companies: People who can be described as unreliable at best are of no use at all. I did not want to be part of that madness and so I finally decided to get out and do what I probably should have done right from the start.

Vocational school: Windows

The German vocational school system is a bit special: You only go to school one or two days (this varies among semesters). What about the other days? You spend them in a company you apply at before you can start the apprenticeship. That way you get to know the daily work routine right from the start (which is a really good thing). School is meant to teach some general skills and at work you learn practical things.

On the first day I went to vocational school, I kind of felt… displaced. Why? Well, coming back to school to teach children is something that takes a moment to adjust to. I enjoyed teaching in general (even though there are always horrible classes as well ;)) but becoming a student again afterwards is really strange. At least for a while.

Subject matter was extremely easy for me. But being almost 30 years old when I started the apprenticeship of course meant that I had a lot more of knowledge and experience than the typical 18 or 20 years old student. However this was a good thing for me since I also have a wife, two children and had to drive about 1.5 hours to school and the same distance back. Which meant that I had far less time for homework or learning than the others. In fact I only found a few hours to learn for the preliminary exam as well as for the final exam. But that’s it.

We had PCs with Windows XP and were required to work with that. Most of my classmates protested because they were used to Windows 7. I simply installed Cygwin, changed tho panel position to top and things were pretty much ok for me (it’s only for a few hours, right?). A while later we got new PCs with Windows 8(.1?) and new policies. The later made it impossible for me to use Cygwin. Since I had never touched anything after Windows XP, I took my time to take a look at that system. In fact I tried to be open for new things and since a lot of time passed since I left Windows, I no longer had any strong feelings towards it. Still Win 8 managed to surprise me: It was even worse than I had thought possible…

The UI was just plain laughable. I have no idea how anybody could do some actual work with it using the mouse. Now, I’m a console guy and I need no mouse to do stuff (if I at least have Cygwin that is). But that must have been a joke, right?

Then I found out that Windows still was not capable of even reading an EXT2 file system. Oh my. So I decided to format one USB key to FAT32 for school. But guess what? When I attached it, Windows made some message pop up that it was installing drivers – which then failed… I removed the USB key and inserted it again. Same story. A classmate told me to try another USB connector. I thought that he was fooling me but he insisted on it so I did it (expecting him to laugh at me any second). To my big surprise this time the driver could be installed! But the story does not end here. No drive icon appeared in the explorer. I removed the USB key again and reattached it once more. Nothing. My classmate took it out yet again and plugged it into the former connector (the one from which installing the driver failed). And this time the drive appeared in the explorer! It was that moment that I realized not too much had changed since XP – despite the even uglier looks. Bluescreens, program crashes and cryptic error messages that I had not seen in years all were back.

I decided that I could not work like that and decided to bring a laptop each school day. Just about all my classmates were fine with Windows however. But speaking of classmates: We lost five of them in the first two years. Two simply never showed up again, two more were fired by their companies (due to various misbehavings) and thus could not continue their apprenticeship and the other one had a serious problem with alcohol (being just 17 years old) and was also fired.

BYOD: Linux desktop

My laptop was running Linux Mint. When I bought it, it came with Mint pre-installed. My wife got used to that system and did not like my idea to install a different system (I mainly use Arch Linux as a desktop at work and on other PCs at home) and so Linux Mint stayed on there.

There were a few classmates interested in Linux in general. These quickly became the ones that I spend most of my time in school with. Three already had some experience with it but that’s it. One of them decided that it was time to switch to Linux about a year ago. I introduced him to Arch and he’s a happy Antergos (an Arch-based distro) user since then. Another classmate was also unhappy with Windows at home. I answered a few questions and helped with the usual little problems and she successfully made the switch and runs Mint now.

Some teachers couldn’t quite understand how one could be such a weirdo and not even have one single Windows PC. We were supposed to finish some project planning using some Microsoft software (forgot the name of it). I told the teacher that the required software wouldn’t run on any of my operating systems. Anything not Windows obviously wasn’t thinkable for him and he replied that in that case I’d really have to update! I explained to him that this was not the case since I ran a rolling-release distro which was not just up to date but in fact bleeding edge.

When he understood that I only had Linux at home, he asked me to install Windows in that case. Now I told him that I didn’t own any current version of Windows. He rolled his eyes and replied that I could sign up for some Microsoft service (“dream spark” or something?) where each student or apprentice could get it all for free. Then I objected that this would be of no use since I could not install Windows even if I had a license because I did not agree to Microsoft’s EULA. For a moment he did not know what to say. Then he asked me to please do it at work then. “Sorry”, I replied, “we don’t use Windows in the office either.” After that he just walked away saying nothing.

We were required to learn some basics about object-orientated programming – using C#. So I got mono as well as monodevelop and initially followed the course.

Another Laptop: Puffy for fun!

I got an older laptop for a really cheap price from a classmate and put OpenBSD on there. After having played a bit with that OS in virtual machines I wanted to run it on real hardware and so that seemed to be the perfect chance to do it. OpenBSD with full disk encryption and everything worked really nice and I even got monodevelop on there (even though it was an ancient version). So after a week I decided to use that laptop in school because it was much smaller and lighter (14″ instead of 18.3″!) – and also cheaper. 😉

After upgrading to OpenBSD 5.6 however, I realized that the mono package had been updated from 2.10.9p3 to 3.4.0p1 which broke the ancient (2.4.2p3 – from 2011!) version of monodevelop. Now I had the option of bringing that big Linux laptop again or downgrade OpenBSD to 5.5 again. I decided to go with option 3 and complain about .NET instead. By now the programming course teacher already knew me and I received permission to do the exercises with C++ instead! He just warned me that I’d be mostly on my own in that case and that I’d of course have to write the classroom tests on C# just like everyone else. I could live with that and it worked out really well. Later when we started little GUI programs with winforms I would have been out of luck even on Linux and mono anyway. So I did these with C++ and the FLTK toolkit.

Around christmas I visited my parents for some days. My mother’s computer (a Linux machine I had set up for her) stopped working. As my father decided that he’d replace it with a new Windows box (as that’s what he knows), I gave up my OpenBSD laptop. I installed Linux on it again and gave it to my mother as a replacement to prevent her having to re-learn everything on a Windows computer…

Beastie’s turn

So for the last couple of weeks I was back on Linux. However the final exam consists of two parts: A written exam and an oral one. The later is mostly a presentation of a 35 hour project that we had to do last year. I took the chance and chose a project involving FreeBSD (comparing configuration management tools for use on that particular OS). We also had to hand in a documentation of that project.

Six days before the presentation was to be held, I decided that it would suck to present a FreeBSD project using Linux. So I announced to my wife that I’d install a different OS on it now, did a full backup, inserted a PC-BSD 10.2 cd and rebooted. What then happened is a story of its own… With FreeBSD 10.3 just around the corner I’ll wait until that is released and write about my experiences with PC-BSD in a future blog post. Just so much for now: I have PC-BSD installed on the laptop – and that’s what I use to write this post.

The presentation also succeeded more or less (had a problem with Libre Office). But the big issue was that I obviously chose a topic that was too much for my examiners. My documentation was “too technical” (!) for them and they would have liked to see “a comparison with other operating systems, like Windows (!)” – which simply was far beyond the scope of my project… I ended up with a medicore mark for the project which is in complete contrast to the final grade of the vocational school (where I missed a perfect average by 0.1).

Ok, I cannot say that this came completely unexpected. I had been warned. Just a few years earlier, another apprentice chose a Linux topic and even failed the final exam! He took action against the examiners and court decided in his favor. His work was reviewed by people with Linux knowledge – and all of a sudden he was no longer failing but in fact got a 1 (German equivalent to an A)! I won’t sue anybody since I have passed. Still my conclusion here is that we need more people who dare to bring *nix topics on the list. I would do it again anytime. If you’re in the same situation: Please consider it.

Oh, and for another small success: The former classmate who runs Antergos also tried out FreeBSD on his server after I recommended it. He has come to like jails, the ports system and package audit among other things. One new happy *BSD user may not be much. But it’s certainly a good thing! Also all of my former classmates now at least know that *BSD exists. I’ve held presentations about that and mentioned it in many cases. Awareness for *nix systems and what they can do may lead to giving it a try some time in the future.

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Craven New World – or how to ruin the net

Alright. I never expected to write about anything remotely “political” on my blog… It’s about technical things, right? Ok, ok, free software is “political” all by itself. Kind of. But that’s about it.

While at times I’m really sick of what happens on the world, that doesn’t fit well on a blog about computer topics. I admit that I was tempted two or three times to write something about all the blatant and ruthless lies against Russia and things like that. But this is not the right place for those topics. So I resisted. Then came July 1st…

I begun to write a full-sized rant on that day but in the end decided to drop it and re-think things when I got calm again. Since I’m still stunned and angry at the same time, I’ve simply got to write an article now nevertheless.

The one and only

In that morning I read about how Paypal froze ProtonMail’s account. While it is nothing new that Paypal freezes accounts, the rationale was quite interesting. ProtonMail is a provider of email services. What makes them stand out is that they are developing an easy-to-use email system that features end-to-end encryption.

Now it’s a well-known fact that there are powers out there who have no respect at all for your privacy. They want to know where you go, what you download and what you talk about when you mail grandma. You could be a dangerous villain, skilled to pretend the contrary after all – and if they can’t find out what color your underwear is, you might even get away with it!

From that point of view, encryption is… well, irritating to say the least. Which makes it a clear thing that ProtonMail sucks big time. How dare they help people who prefer to keep private things private? So Paypal froze their account, because that company “wasn’t sure whether ProtonMail had approval by the gouvernment” for their business. As a matter of fact, the US have quite a few strange laws. But that’s another thing and it’s perfectly fine if an American company doesn’t wish to assist another American company in doing something unlawful. Except – ProtonMail is not an American company… It’s based in Switzerland!

How can it be that a Swiss company would require US approval for their business? And it’s not even the first time that something like that happens. The USA has blackmailed Switzerland not too long ago. And with their “compliance” ideology they are choking many others, too. This is a very alarming and gross practice. But it is, I cannot repeat it often enough, nothing new.

Just hand it to us!

A while later I read about how Microsoft had just seized more than 20 domains owned by no-ip. This cut off almost two million users from using the no-ip service. And what was the reason for such a draconian action? Was the life of the president at stake? Nope. Was the whole country threatened by some ancient evil perhaps? Not really. It was far worse than that: Microsoft had found a judge which allowed the domain seizure because Microsoft claimed that there were two accounts involved in spreading malware…

This was the moment I had to take a look at the calendar just to make sure that I didn’t mess up things and it was actually April 1st! But no – unfortunately not.

I just want to add that I am not an no-ip user and wasn’t affected personally. But I know people who were – one was even affected enough to finally give Linux more room both for private use and in his company. So while the whole thing is pretty much insane it has its good sides, too. Especially since I expect more people to be really upset after what Microsoft did. Maybe they should rather spend their time fixing their own broken windows than throwing stones at other people’s business?

Oy vey, we want your money!

Ah, what a day. We had some news which were hard to believe if such things weren’t happening over and over again. Then there was some news which left me incredulously shaking my head. What Microsoft did was ludicrous and the fact that some judge ruled in their favor is downright absurd. That cannot possibly be surpassed, can it? Yes. Unfortunately it can.

The last news is just so completely off the scala, that I don’t find any words for it (even in my native language that is). While the Microsoft case makes you question your sanity, the other thing that happened makes you struggle for your faith in mankind. Seriously.

So what happened? Well. More or less this:

Group A (private individuals) who are citizens of
state B (Israel) mandate
organisation C (a jewish law firm) to sue
state D (shiit (!) theocracy Iran) in
state E (the USA) for alleged financial support of
organisation F (sunni (!) Hamas) who are accused of
action G (a terrorist attack) in
territory H (the Gaza stripe) which belongs to
state I (Palestine) as group A claims they have suffered from action G.

Now under normal circumstances you’d laugh at any weirdo who can come up with such an idea – let alone actually carry it out… When you’re finished laughing and wiped the tears out of your eyes, you wish him that he’ll find a good mental doctor.

The story is not over, however. The US court rules in favor of the claimant – and since Iran did what any sane person would do and denies this arrogant impertinence, there’s now the fine (like I said I’m at a loss for words) idea: distrainment of the Iranian TLD (.ir)!!

Come on! Distrain a TLD on the net? Seems like they are really working hard to ruin the net. Congratulations to all those bright people involved.

What’s the world coming to?

In my country (Germany) the phenomena of anti-americanism is on the rise. Many people are in rage because of what the NSA did (and without any doubt continues to do). This is a rather sad thing actually, but in many cases I agree with what people say. The US government is one of the most corrupted an unsound entities of the world. Yet – and that deserves to be emphasized – that doesn’t make all Americans warmongers or liars.

The government in my country is run by criminals as well and so I’m probably not in the best position to complain. After all former chancellor Schröder openly admitted (in one of the biggest newspapers of the country!) that the NATO bombings in Yugoslavia (which he supported) were against international law. By stating so he confessed to be a war criminal – and that had no consequences whatsoever. Funny, isn’t it? And still I’d admit any time that I think of him as a more “honest” person than current chancellor Merkel…

Action!

I’d really like to ask every and all Americans to try hard and reclaim their country. But there’s not too much people who value freedom can do right now. Yet there is one thing we can all do: Start using encryption. Yes, invest that half of an hour to teach your grandmother how to write and read encrypted mail. It’s not that hard.

You are telling me that you have nothing to hide? That’s great! Why? Simple: Same here. It’s great because it is this important little fact that makes us qualify to begin encrypting. Currently it makes you suspect if you use encryption. Well, I can live with that.

I also don’t mind if those who think they absolutely have to know what I mail my grandmother break the encryption. But if they want to, they may well invest quite a bit of effort. If they find it worth the time and resources to learn how much my children have grown since we last visited her, that’s fine for me. If everybody used encryption it would be a normal activity. Let’s aim for that!

So – what about you?

First things first – how I came to Linux (pt. 2)

Welcome back!

Where was I? Right… Windows XP.

Windows XP

When I first saw it, I just thought: “You’ve got to be kidding!” What was this? A blue task bar with a green start button and a terribly colorful background! I still recall what came to my mind next: “Don’t do drugs, man!” Of course, a few seconds later, I had it all set back to classic. Then I attempted to update the system. Guess what? It didn’t work – IE crashed. I tried again, but same thing. Great stuff!

Reboot. What’s this? The desktop is back to ugly! Alright, let’s change it aga… What? It’s still set as “classic”? Wow, if that‘s classic, I don’t know where I’ve been all the years. Let’s set it to “new”. Of course nothing changes. And now back to classic. Ahh, much better. Windows update again? Crash! You know what, buddy? Just go to hell (from where thou must’ve risen)!

Put DOS boot disk in floppy drive, reset. Wait a moment. FDISK.

Yes, that was my first contact with Windows XP. And as you can see, we didn’t really get friends right away… Actually I disliked about everything of this new OS. The exorbitant size when installed, the wasteful usage of RAM, the way it dares to tell me what I wasn’t allowed to do (on my system! Who the heck decides this? Myself – or Micro$oft?), and so on. Not even to talk about forced registration, which is completely unacceptable. M$ got our money and my father used to register every version of Windows with M$ – voluntary. Which is fine. But I was really angry and this was the moment when Redmond begun to lose me, too. I decided to go on with Win2k for as long as possible and then abandon the Windows platform.

Windows 2000 with control panel right after installation: Clean looks.
Freshly installed Windows XP with control panel: Could be called “CandyOS”!

Alternatives?

But where to go then? I had been playing around with FreeDOS and achieved some incredible things (burning CDs in DOS, watching DivX videos on a Pentium 90, browse the net graphically, running Windows applications on DOS, etc.). I liked the system a lot since I knew what every single file on my system was good for and there was not one program or anything there that I didn’t want to have on my drive. But frankly speaking… DOS is not a modern desktop system – especially since drivers are a huge problem and FD-32 seems to go nowhere. It’s very nice for tinkering but not a real alternative.

Meh, Linux…

I had known Linux for a while. That means I had known that it existed. A teacher who tried to get into it himself had founded a “Linux club”. Being interested in computers in general, I had joined it. But while the teacher was trying to get things working, the rest of us typically had Windows running on their machine and played network games or surfed the net. As far as I can remember, we started with SuSE 6.2 back then (SuSE was the most popular distro in Germany at that time). I looked at the system only briefly and found it to be far too complicated. What I disliked most at that time was the case-sensitive file system. I just witnessed it cause trouble all the time.

SuSE favored KDE over GNOME. Being a Windows user at the time I didn’t quite get it how there could be more than one DE and I thought: “If KDE is the standard one, it must be the better one, too.” Fatal thinking! While I liked the bash a lot, I hated KDE. So I decided that Linux wasn’t a choice for my home pc…

At home I had convinced my father that we needed a router pc so that all our pcs could access the internet at the same time. We had another old pc that was just collecting dust anyway but no idea how to set up a machine as a router. Thinking about our club, I proposed Linux. It was allowed to copy it freely after all and I knew that it was perfectly suited for such a task. My father agreed but instead of downloading it for free, he bought SuSE 7.0 Professional. Primarily because of the support option for it as he said.


Our SuSE 7.0 Professional box

It came with kernel 2.2.17, XFree86 4.0, KDE 1.1.2, GNOME 1.2 and StarOffice 5.2!

Thanks to a friend who was a bit into Linux, we managed to get a router up and running. It was painful, though, and took us more than one evening/night of configuration work… But once the server was up, it just worked. And it did so for a very long time. Only after a power outage it refused to boot up again, since the filesystems were reported damaged.

We reorganized our network so that we no longer needed the router pc. I kind of forgot about Linux for quite some time.

Win XP – again

When I bought a new pc, I got a dual-core CPU. Finally I realized that I could not really go on with Win2k anymore. I thought that I had no other option but to install XP. And as I had a legal license for it, anyway, I did. I was never happy with this OS, though and I still consider it a bearable operating system but surely not a decent or even great one.

“Vista”

I heard about this new “Windows Vista” and of course read about it on the net. Now this time I wasn’t angry. “Vista” didn’t even deserve it. It was just plain laughable. Not an OS at all but rather an abomination. This time it was clear that I would never buy it. No sir, I’ve really had it this time! For a while I might stick with XP – but what to do then?

One day when I was really fed up with my Win XP, I decided to give Linux a shot again and see what had happened in the meantime.

Linux!

Everybody was talking about Ubuntu these days. I knew that there were live-CDs and I thought that this was a pretty nice thing that I just had to try out for myself. So I downloaded an Ubuntu image and burned it on a cd. Shortly thereafter the fun started.

It took quite a while to start up, but this was because of the slow cd drive. After it finished loading, I was immediately impressed. Now this was a desktop to my liking! Something way different – but for the better. Very clearly laid out and simple to use. At first I found it strange to have two panels, but I soon liked that, too. I played around with it for a while and for the first time in years, I “felt at home”. It was also great to have Open Office pre-installed just like many other useful programs.

Since I was willing to change anyway, I made a backup of my drives and then installed Ubuntu as a second system. It worked well and I used it more and more often. After finding out how things work and getting replacements for programs I used to work with, I soon booted into Windows just rarely and finally decided to kick it. I also was a bit older now and didn’t consider things like the way the drives are organized “strange” but actually realized that it was superior.

KDE 1 (SuSE 7) – this is what actually prevented me from using Linux in 1999.
GNOME 2 (Ubuntu 8.10) – and this got me back to it!

A lot has happened since then. My beloved GNOME 2.x is dead (save for MATE), Ubuntu has changed for Unity (which I deem unusable on a desktop) and so on. I tried out a lot of distros and desktop environments and learned to live with the big ecosystem that is Linux (GNU/Linux and other software but also the community and the spirit). There’s a mass of things going on – many that I like and some which I don’t like. But this is where you begin to do things your own way, right?

What’s next?

The next entry will have the title: “Eerie’s first ‘e’: ‘elementary’!”.

First things first – how I came to Linux (pt. 1)

This is something personal. Why to read this entry? Well, reading a bit about my experiences with computers will give you an idea of what I’m interested in and which direction things are likely to take. Also you perhaps like a little nostalgic retrospect? If not, skip this.

DOS

My dad bought his first pc way back when these were rather expensive and it was not at all common that a family had one. I was a child who could not yet read or write, but I was immediately hooked by this new machine. I enjoyed the simple games that the 80286 offered and didn’t mind that it was all black and white. The first letter I got to know was actually “y” (a VERY uncommon one in German) – the key I had learned to press when a game asked something like “would you like to try again”?

The first operating system I remember was MS-DOS 5.0 – but it’s basically the memory of the less advanced prompt. I got a little older and computers fascinated me even more and more. Soon we had Windows 3.0 and I was often playing around with Paintbrush (more or less the same thing as nowadays’ Paint).

Windows 3.11 (Ger): Main window with groups, icons and Paintbrush open.

At one point my father sold his 286 and bought a 386. Quite some time later, when the new 486 pcs were released, he bought one, too – but instead of selling the old 80386, he gave it to me. My very first own pc!

Over time I taught myself a lot by watching or asking my father and by trying out things on my own. Soon I was rather familiar with my DOS 6.22 and Win 3.11. After school I usually turned on my pc and played games or did other things with it for hours. Remember Lemmings, Commander Keen, Monkey Island, X-Wing/TIE Fighter, WarCraft and many other classics? Since this is where it all begun for me, I still love DOS and DOS games to this day!

WarCraft: Orcs & Humans – Water Elementals destroy an Orcish base.

Win 9.x

Then we got Windows 95. I remember well that I was very excited and got into this new OS quickly. Being all graphical and mouse-driven, I felt that it already lacked something… It just wasn’t the same thing anymore – a bit of the pc’s “magic” was gone (and would vanish more and more over the years, drowned in overly colorful rubbish). Of course, Win 95 came with quite some useful features and so I liked the system (weren’t we all used to the “blue screen of death” phenomena back then?). Well, and it allowed to boot into pure DOS. So everything was fine for me. Also DirectX and a few other new components made very nice new games possible and I certainly had a great time.

My younger brother got his own pc, too, and finally my father gave in and bought three ethernet cards. I got addicted to play multiplayer matches with friends and finally my parents forbid it since we were occupying my brother’s pc a little too often… I also got into map-making with WarCraft II thanks to the editor that came with it.

In school I became friends with a class mate who had taught himself to code. We had a lot of fun with several smaller projects. I also learned to write small programs in qBASIC and later a little Pascal and Delphi.

Doom95 launcher on the Windows 95 operating system (German).

Next I switched to Win 98 (SE, since I knew the FE was extremely unstable). This was about the time when many of my class mates got their first pc. Even years later, I was shocked how little they knew about computers even though they spent a lot of time with them. They couldn’t write a single batch file and if Windows didn’t start… Well, being left with a command line and no mouse they were about to panic! I’m still very grateful that I learned DOS and didn’t start with a graphical system and Win 9.x or even later!

A bit later I was mapping for Jedi Knight with a program called Jed which I found on a compilation CD. This may actually be the first piece of free software of which I was aware that it was coded by enthusiasts instead of regular companies. I thought that this was a great thing and that more people should publish their programs for everybody to use. Then my father decided that it was time to get an internet connection. Since only his pc could connect to the net, I was not online too often, but it was another very interesting thing, too! Especially since there actually was more free software to try out and enjoy!

Windows ME was released and we got that one, too. Yes, I know how much a lot of people despise it, but at first I kind of liked it. It booted up extremely fast and for the first time it didn’t take us some time to get the network working – Win ME just did that automatically. But hey, what’s that? They removed the option to boot into DOS! Right, there was a way to get it back, but I felt that it made the system even more unstable than it was anyway…

Win2k

Next I got Windows 2000 and honestly, I liked the system a lot. There were a few downsides like it being not really suitable for gaming and of course the missing DOS. Oh yes, and I still can’t understand what the hell M$ was thinking in terms of the console… They added some really nice functions that could be great for batching – and at the same time removed CHOICE.COM! Doing so they mindlessly ripped out the heart of batching! Luckily there was the FreeDOS project on the net which provided a CHOICE replacement that I could freely distribute. Soon I configured my pc as a multi-boot machine with Win2k (working) and 98 (gaming). This was the last time when I was quite happy with my Microsoft powered system.

THEN came… Windows XP.

What’s next?

So much for the rather nostalgic part. The next entry will be the second part of this topic.