Top things that I missed in 2015

Another year of blogging comes to an end. It has been quite full of *BSD stuff so that I’d even say: Regarding this blog it has been a BSD year. This was not actually planned but isn’t a real surprise, either. I’ve not given up on Linux (which I use on a daily basis as my primary desktop OS) but it’s clear that I’m fascinated with the BSDs and will try to get into them further in 2016.

Despite being a busy year, there were quite a few things that I would have liked to do and blog about that never happened. I hope to be able to do some of these things next year.

Desktops, toolkits, live DVD

One of the most “successful” (in case of hits) article series was the desktop comparison that I did in 2012. Now in that field a lot has happened since then and I really wanted to do this again. Some desktops are no longer alive others have become available since then and it is a sure thing that the amount of memory needed has changed as well… πŸ˜‰

Also I’ve never been able to finish the toolkit comparison which I stopped in the middle of writing about GTK-based applications. This has been started in 2013 so it would also be about time. However my focus has shifted away from the original intend of finding tools for a light-weight Linux desktop. I’ve become involved with the EDE project (“Equinox Desktop Environment”) that uses the FLTK toolkit and so people could argue that I’m not really unbiased anymore. Then again… I chose to become involved because that was the winner of my last test series – and chances are that the reasons for it are still valid.

And then there’s the “Desktop Demo DVD” subproject that never really took off. I had an Arch-based image with quite some desktops to choose from but there were a few problems: Trinity could not be installed alongside KDE, Unity for Arch was not exactly in good shape, etc. But the biggest issue was the fact that I did not have webspace available to store a big iso file.

My traffic statistics show that there has been a constant interest in the article about creating an Arch Linux live-CD. Unfortunately it is completely obsolete since the tool that creates it has changed substantially. I’d really like to write an updated version somewhen.

In fact I wanted to start over with the desktop tests this summer and had started with this. However Virtual Box hardware acceleration for graphics was broken on Arch, and since this is a real blocker I could not continue (has this been resolved since?).

OSes

I wrote an article about HURD in 2013, too, and wanted to re-visit a HURD-based system to see what happened in the mean time. ArchHURD has been in coma for quite some time. Just recently there was a vital sign however. I wish the new developer best luck and will surely do another blog post about it once there’s something usable to show off!

The experiments with Arch and an alternative libc (musl) were stopped due to a lack of time and could be taken further. This has been an interesting project that I’d like to continue some time in some form. I also had some reviews of interesting but lesser known Linux distros in mind. Not sure if I find time for that, though.

There has been a whole lot going about both FreeBSD and OpenBSD. Still I would have liked to do more in that field (exploring jails, ZFS, etc.). But that’s things I’ll do in 2016 for sure.

Hardware

I’ve played a bit with a Raspberry 2 and built a little router with it using a security orientated Linux distro. It was a fun project to do and maybe it is of any use to somebody.

One highlight that I’m looking forward to mess with is the RISC-V platform, a very promising effort to finally give us a CPU that is actually open hardware!

Other things

There are a few other things that I want to write about and hope to find time for soon. I messed with some version control tools a while back and this would make a nice series of articles, I think. Also I have something about devops in mind and want to do a brief comparison of some configuration management tools (Puppet, Chef, Salt Stack, Ansible – and perhaps some more). If there is interest in that I might pick it up and document some examples on FreeBSD or OpenBSD (there’s more than enough material for Linux around but *BSD is often a rather weak spot). We’ll see.

Well, and I still have one article about GPL vs. BSD license(s) in store that will surely happen next year. That and a few topics about programming that I’ve been thinking about writing for a while now.

So – goodbye 2015 and welcome 2016!

Happy new year everyone! As you can see, I have not run out of ideas. πŸ™‚

Puffy goes Pacman!

This post reveals a new Arch distribution: ArchBSD/Open! I know that this comes unexpectedly; I was surprised, too, after all. In fact it was just by accident that I learned about the new project that will be officially announced on the OpenBSD Journal any day now.

The new distro’s leaked logo

A bit of background

Arch Linux is a Linux distro that is small, simple and light-weight. And it has pacman! This combination proves to be a real success story. Besides Arch Linux we have today: Arch LinuxARM, ArchBang, ArchHurd and probably even more Arches!

Right, one of these other ones is ArchBSD – I’ve blogged about it almost two years ago. It is still around, so it obviously managed to survive. It’s a nice little distro but there’s one thing wrong with it: The name! Why that? Because it is a FreeBSD distribution and even FreeBSD users admit now and then that this is not the only BSD system out there! Right now all other BSD systems are discriminated against. This is a situation both unacceptable and unbearable which must come to an end immediately! It is a matter of life and deathjuice … justice!

Promised some background, eh? Here’s a daemon police wallpaper!

To reflect the fact that it is not the only BSD, the project totally needs to change the name to ArchBSD/Free.

A petition that will force the maintainers with tens of thousands of signatures will soon be started. Feel free to hop over to their forum and tell them that their project name downright sucks, if you can’t wait. Explain why and start demanding that the project be renamed. And while you are at it, tell ’em that ArchBSD/Free is so much cooler, anyway! It sounds more important, it’s more precise, more fun and more to type!

Puffy loves Pacman

There are three reasons why ArchBSD/Open was created. The first one is: With ArchBSD’s name change to ArchBSD/Free the need arose to provide an ArchBSD/something because otherwise that addition to the name would just sound stupid and be superfluous.

The second one: The world needs more Arch!!

That and the fact that Puffy just loves pacman (well, everybody does, right?)!

With so many good reasons for it, it was just a matter of time until a dedicated team formed to make the dream come true. Now the work for it is finally done and will soon be made public.

Puffy loves pacman!

Release time

Well, while the product is already completed, there’s of course one little detail which blocks the publication. No, it’s not even something technical. Or perhaps it is. Depends on how you look at it. The problem is: The webpage is not done, yet! Yeah, it’s the simple things in life which can cause the biggest trouble.

So what’s the release date? Unfortunately there’s no release date currently. Why? Ok, ok, if you absolutely must know, I’ll tell you. All technical difficulties of bringing Pacman to OpenBSD were solved rather quickly. But despite the team’s best efforts they have not been able to agree on the website design! Er, that is, there is no design, yet, which to agree on…

Think about it for a minute and you’ll see why: FreeBSD’s mascot is Beastie. He’s a daemon with a fork (and rather awkward shoes for whatever reason – probably he just likes them). That’s an easy mascot to work with as it is not hard at all to imagine an Arch daemon: A bigger, badder and probably even redder version of Beastie. But OpenBSD’s mascot is Puffy! Now how on earth does an Arch Blowfish look like and how to come up with a nice theme where it fits in?!

There have been voices inside the team to just make a simple webpage for now and get the release done. The OS was more important than the theme after all. Those ignorants have been kicked off the team of course and their access revoked. That’s a bit harsh? No, not at all! Sorry, this is OpenBSD after all. You cannot make a release without high quality artwork!

Puffy shot first! An example of the very nice OpenBSD artwork

Oh, stop complaining now, will you? If it weren’t for one of the expelled, I wouldn’t have learned about the project’s existence and that means you, too, wouldn’t. Now the big question is: Will ArchBSD/Open ever be released? *sigh* Frankly speaking, I don’t know. I didn’t manage to make contact with the project leader.

But after trying to get in contact for weeks now there’s one thing that I can say for sure: The whole team leaves a rather fishy impression!

Craven New World – or how to ruin the net

Alright. I never expected to write about anything remotely “political” on my blog… It’s about technical things, right? Ok, ok, free software is “political” all by itself. Kind of. But that’s about it.

While at times I’m really sick of what happens on the world, that doesn’t fit well on a blog about computer topics. I admit that I was tempted two or three times to write something about all the blatant and ruthless lies against Russia and things like that. But this is not the right place for those topics. So I resisted. Then came July 1st…

I begun to write a full-sized rant on that day but in the end decided to drop it and re-think things when I got calm again. Since I’m still stunned and angry at the same time, I’ve simply got to write an article now nevertheless.

The one and only

In that morning I read about how Paypal froze ProtonMail’s account. While it is nothing new that Paypal freezes accounts, the rationale was quite interesting. ProtonMail is a provider of email services. What makes them stand out is that they are developing an easy-to-use email system that features end-to-end encryption.

Now it’s a well-known fact that there are powers out there who have no respect at all for your privacy. They want to know where you go, what you download and what you talk about when you mail grandma. You could be a dangerous villain, skilled to pretend the contrary after all – and if they can’t find out what color your underwear is, you might even get away with it!

From that point of view, encryption is… well, irritating to say the least. Which makes it a clear thing that ProtonMail sucks big time. How dare they help people who prefer to keep private things private? So Paypal froze their account, because that company “wasn’t sure whether ProtonMail had approval by the gouvernment” for their business. As a matter of fact, the US have quite a few strange laws. But that’s another thing and it’s perfectly fine if an American company doesn’t wish to assist another American company in doing something unlawful. Except – ProtonMail is not an American company… It’s based in Switzerland!

How can it be that a Swiss company would require US approval for their business? And it’s not even the first time that something like that happens. The USA has blackmailed Switzerland not too long ago. And with their “compliance” ideology they are choking many others, too. This is a very alarming and gross practice. But it is, I cannot repeat it often enough, nothing new.

Just hand it to us!

A while later I read about how Microsoft had just seized more than 20 domains owned by no-ip. This cut off almost two million users from using the no-ip service. And what was the reason for such a draconian action? Was the life of the president at stake? Nope. Was the whole country threatened by some ancient evil perhaps? Not really. It was far worse than that: Microsoft had found a judge which allowed the domain seizure because Microsoft claimed that there were two accounts involved in spreading malware…

This was the moment I had to take a look at the calendar just to make sure that I didn’t mess up things and it was actually April 1st! But no – unfortunately not.

I just want to add that I am not an no-ip user and wasn’t affected personally. But I know people who were – one was even affected enough to finally give Linux more room both for private use and in his company. So while the whole thing is pretty much insane it has its good sides, too. Especially since I expect more people to be really upset after what Microsoft did. Maybe they should rather spend their time fixing their own broken windows than throwing stones at other people’s business?

Oy vey, we want your money!

Ah, what a day. We had some news which were hard to believe if such things weren’t happening over and over again. Then there was some news which left me incredulously shaking my head. What Microsoft did was ludicrous and the fact that some judge ruled in their favor is downright absurd. That cannot possibly be surpassed, can it? Yes. Unfortunately it can.

The last news is just so completely off the scala, that I don’t find any words for it (even in my native language that is). While the Microsoft case makes you question your sanity, the other thing that happened makes you struggle for your faith in mankind. Seriously.

So what happened? Well. More or less this:

Group A (private individuals) who are citizens of
state B (Israel) mandate
organisation C (a jewish law firm) to sue
state D (shiit (!) theocracy Iran) in
state E (the USA) for alleged financial support of
organisation F (sunni (!) Hamas) who are accused of
action G (a terrorist attack) in
territory H (the Gaza stripe) which belongs to
state I (Palestine) as group A claims they have suffered from action G.

Now under normal circumstances you’d laugh at any weirdo who can come up with such an idea – let alone actually carry it out… When you’re finished laughing and wiped the tears out of your eyes, you wish him that he’ll find a good mental doctor.

The story is not over, however. The US court rules in favor of the claimant – and since Iran did what any sane person would do and denies this arrogant impertinence, there’s now the fine (like I said I’m at a loss for words) idea: distrainment of the Iranian TLD (.ir)!!

Come on! Distrain a TLD on the net? Seems like they are really working hard to ruin the net. Congratulations to all those bright people involved.

What’s the world coming to?

In my country (Germany) the phenomena of anti-americanism is on the rise. Many people are in rage because of what the NSA did (and without any doubt continues to do). This is a rather sad thing actually, but in many cases I agree with what people say. The US government is one of the most corrupted an unsound entities of the world. Yet – and that deserves to be emphasized – that doesn’t make all Americans warmongers or liars.

The government in my country is run by criminals as well and so I’m probably not in the best position to complain. After all former chancellor SchrΓΆder openly admitted (in one of the biggest newspapers of the country!) that the NATO bombings in Yugoslavia (which he supported) were against international law. By stating so he confessed to be a war criminal – and that had no consequences whatsoever. Funny, isn’t it? And still I’d admit any time that I think of him as a more “honest” person than current chancellor Merkel…

Action!

I’d really like to ask every and all Americans to try hard and reclaim their country. But there’s not too much people who value freedom can do right now. Yet there is one thing we can all do: Start using encryption. Yes, invest that half of an hour to teach your grandmother how to write and read encrypted mail. It’s not that hard.

You are telling me that you have nothing to hide? That’s great! Why? Simple: Same here. It’s great because it is this important little fact that makes us qualify to begin encrypting. Currently it makes you suspect if you use encryption. Well, I can live with that.

I also don’t mind if those who think they absolutely have to know what I mail my grandmother break the encryption. But if they want to, they may well invest quite a bit of effort. If they find it worth the time and resources to learn how much my children have grown since we last visited her, that’s fine for me. If everybody used encryption it would be a normal activity. Let’s aim for that!

So – what about you?

Eerie’s second birthday!

Today is the first day of my third blogging year. It’s hard to believe that it has been two years already but I checked the date of the first post: 06/24/2012. So it is really true. Two years are a long time and since the last birthday post a lot has happened again. For that reason I’m going to try to sum that up for you. And don’t worry: I’ll try to keep this birthday post shorter than the last one. πŸ˜‰

Origins and goals

I started the EERIE project because I wanted to really “get into Linux” instead of only using it. I didn’t know at all where that journey would take me when I set the initial goal to compare Linux desktops. In the first year it was mostly desktop centered posts that I wrote. Besides that I evaluated which Linux distribution would fit my needs, how a live cd is created, etc. In the last few months my interests shifted and wrote about other Unix-like systems as I begun exploring Linux’s “neighbors”.

What has happened in the last year?

In the second year I tried to get back on track and continue with the toolkit tests. But I was soon distracted from it and drawn towards different fields. The new focus clearly was package management, package building and the creation of a Linux distribution.

Since I was pretty confident that I would succeed in putting together an experimental light-weight Linux distribution, I registered a website for it. It has been severely neglected and not received any updates since October… Not having done anything with HTML for about 10 years, using a free template had been an obvious choice to begin with. In the mean time I invested a few hours to learn proper HTML 4.01 and some CSS but I have no idea when I get around to re-design the website. These things are moving forward very slowly.

A short series of posts dealt with the updating of an old Linux distribution where active maintenance had stopped several years ago. It was interesting to do and has been of interest for others, too, since I got a bit more of feedback on that topic.

The most important thing was two distributions that I created: An Arch-like distribution for i586 and one experimental one where I tried to build as many packages as possible using clang, an alternative init system, etc. Both worked quite well and while I never uploaded the i586 work, the other distribution was published as Arch:E5.

In addition to that I’ve got in contact with some nice people and interesting projects which is something I value greatly!

Blog & statistics

The blog’s monthly visitors

As you can see in the picture, the monthly visitors have increased in the second year over the first. In most months I had between 650 and 700 visitors. Exceptions were September with less than 600 hits and October with over 750. The blog has exceeded 10.000 total visitors clearly and features over 30 comments now.

The wordpress Trophy Case

While the wordpress “Trophy Case” is basically just play, I actually like it because it also shows the date of the day when the “medal” was “earned”. This makes the whole thing graphically polished statistics with some actual value.

Hits by country

I’ve had visitors from 114 countries around the earth and thus the white parts on the map are getting fewer and fewer!

Future

I’m having far less time for my computer projects compared to when I started the blog – and I think that really shows. In June I’ve had the lowest monthly hit count since more than one year (at least right now; the month isn’t over yet).

The reason for it is that I’m no longer studying at the university (which gave me enough free time). During the last year I’ve moved to another federal state, sought a job and moved again when I found one. And if my job (as well as the hours that I spend each day to get there and back home again) didn’t mean enough work and time lost, I’ve got even less spare time for another reason. For a positive reason fortunately: The birth of my second child!

So what does that mean? Currently it’s a bit hard to publish at least one new post each month but I’m not willing to retire yet! I just can’t make any promises on exactly what I’ll be able to write about in the forseeable future. Will it be toolkits again? The musl based Arch-like distribution? Some BSD things? Maybe a bit of everything or maybe something entirely different. Who knows? (I don’t!)

New year – looking back at 2013

Happy new year 2014 everybody!

For me the second blogging year has passed and the third one stands at the door. A good opportunity to look back at what 2013 brought!

Last year went by quickly from my perspective. This was due to huge and time-consuming changes in my life. Still I managed to publish 22 posts in the last 12 month – probably not too bad.

Topics

While I had intended to simply continue with the toolkit specific application tests, I chose to open up the blog for more diverse topics. The blogging year started with a series of memory consumption tests of various Qt-based applications. Following Canonical’s announcement of Mir I simply had to write about the Linux desktop again.

Experimenting with various Unix-like systems beside Linux during that time I chose to write about that topic, too. And being an Arch user, it suggests itself to introduce the ArchHurd and ArchBSD projects

Next was an interesting interview with the developer of the FLTK-based Equinox Desktop Environment, just before the Blog’s first birthday post.

The second half of the year started with the first GTK+ application tests. Since there are just so many terminals around which are built upon this toolkit, this was quite a bit of work. For that reason I decided to postpone further GTK+ application tests – and in fact I haven’t had the time for them up to now!

A sample of what elderlinux.org currently looks like

An American programmer got in touch with me and we soon agreed to work together on some projects. This was the initial spark for me to seriously start working on an experimental i586 distribution. Due to it progressing nicely, I registered the domain elderlinux.org which is meant to be the future home of various things related to distribution creation. I hadn’t written any html for more than 10 years and it took me quite some effort to come up with something that doesn’t instantly make your eyes bleed. Unfortunately I don’t have the time to update the page regularly.

I had used ConnochaetOS in the past and was a bit sad to see it shut down. Since I was building an Arch-inspired i586 distro, too, I decided to blog about it before it would vanish. Development of that distribution effectively stopped in 2011 and A LOT has happened since then in the rolling-release world of Arch. This made a journey possible which was more like a time-travel. In a series of three posts I described how such an old system could be (partially) updated to meet today’s standards. I had actually also updated the kernel, bootloader and made the switch from the old init-system to systemd in my VM, but I had forgotten to take screenshots and didn’t find the time to write another post about it, anyway.

While the i586 distribution is generally in a pretty usable shape, the project has already become a bit too big. It currently has repositories worth of several GB of data – and I honestly have no idea how I could share this with others. I was playing around with several other things again, anyway. I decided to put this project on hold when I gave in to the idea of going just one step back: Building something that could be used together with a big distribution (Arch) instead of being completely incompatible with anything but itself. This eventually lead to the creation of Arch:E5 and the last blog post of last year.

A little bit statistics

This kind of retrospect posts wouldn’t be complete without a bit of statistic, would it? So here it comes! Each and every month has surpassed the previous peeks by far. The blog had about 1.000 hits in 2012 – and even if you take into account that I didn’t start to blog before late June, the > 6.600 total hits of 2013 were simply amazing!

The weekly hit statistic on 12/31/2013

The least successful month was January which just barely beat December 2012 with about 320 hits. There was one month (April) which scored a little lower and two which had significantly fewer hits than the previous month. The best one of the year was October with well over 750 hits! The new all-time peak of page hits occurred on 10/11 with 85 in one day!

The monthly hit statistic on 12/31/2013

My blog got even more hits from around the world. However the top countries didn’t change much, so I’ll skip the graphic for it this time. But here’s the map:

Hits by country

Due to the higher variety and new sub-projects some new tags have been added. However these were added to recently to carry much weight.

Tags and categories

Now for some very pleasant changes: I finally started receiving the first comments which are not spam! πŸ˜‰ And yes, I’m pretty happy about that.

Some comments at last!

For those interested in exact numbers (and to document these statistics for later), here’s a summary:

Monthly and yearly totals

Daily averages

Very suitable for the blog’s first birthday, it was this day that scored four trophies! The trophy case also holds medals for 10 followers and likes now, but I think this little graphic is even nicer:


Four trophies for EERIE on the blog’s birthday

Outlook

So what’s going to come this year? Well, who knows? Honestly: I don’t know. There are three things I intend to dedicate some time to: The GTK+ application tests, the Desktop Demo DVD and of course Arch:E5. But as the past year has shown there’s no chance to know before what exactly will happen. But that’s a good thing actually. So let’s just see what 2014 has in store for all of us!

Status update

Just as the title says this post is meant as a little status update. I’m currently having little free time – so don’t expect any big things right now. But there are of course still a few things going on which I wanted to let you know about.

elderlinux.org

The project homepage has finally received something that can be called a design. I’m using a slightly modified version of a template which is available for free use. So far everybody I asked liked the colors. Any (different) opinion? Write me a comment and tell me!

Also the homepage offers some limited content now. It’s still not much but it’s a beginning.

The new elderlinux.org design

Free time is scarce and the process of building the homepage and maintaining it is something which will take me a while to get familiar with. So this does of course have a huge impact on both my blogging activity here and on the EERIE development.

eerielinux.wordpress.com

While I’ve certainly only used a small percentage of all the functions WP.com offers me for free, I’m pretty much accustomed to work with these after more than a year of blogging. Despite that the world WP.com is slowly getting too small for me and the needs of this blog. On the one hand it offers a lot of features I never felt the need for. On the other however there are features which it doesn’t provide and among which are some I’d really like to use.

The one big problem I was having for quite a while was that I’d like to adjust the width of the two columns the blog page consists of. Not possible with WP.com. And now finally with the homepage up the need arises for a consistent theming. The template which I use for the page even offers a WP.org theme, too. But it’s not possible to use it with free WP.com.

These two issues are the main reasons why I’m considering to move a way from WP.com free hosting. This is also why I’m going to try out if I’m able to manage a WP.org installation myself. The plan is to set one up on a private pc and play around with it until I’m satisfied. The next step would be researching how to migrate this blog to a self-hosted one. I haven’t found the time to do anything in that direction but I’ll keep you updated.

GTK+ tests

So far I’ve started compiling a list of GTK+ based file managers. I’m not done with it, yet, but I hope that I can start testing them soon.

Afterwards, just like with Qt, I intend to test some GTK+ text editors, too. That would conclude the GTK+ series of posts.

DDD and desktops in general

Recently I’ve come into a situation where a better version of the DDD would have come in handy. For that reason I plan to soon give it another shot, too. And the desktop comparison of last year has been one of the strong points of this blog. However I feel that a lot of things have changed since then. E.g. OpenCDE is gone, Consort has arrived and it might be nice to compare new values against the ones from last year! Maybe it is a good idea to repeat these tests? Feel free to comment on that issue. I’m slightly in favour of repeating it but – again – time is the limiting factor here.

What’s next?

Good question. There’s currently a whole lot of things which I’ve started working at. Most likely I’ll try to get the GTK+ file managers done first. But at this point I won’t promise anything.

EERIE’s first birthday!

Today it’s exactly once year since I’ve made my first post here. One whole year has passed on this project and it’s time again to look back. If EERIE was a human child, it’d still be wearing diapers but would also have grown quite a bit and learned enough to make the parents proud!

Where EERIE comes from

On a personal level I was an ordinary Linux user who wanted to get to know his operating better. Distro hopping was fun (and informative) for some time but I wanted to get into it a fair bit deeper. While this of course involves a lot of reading, it’s always best to just try out things yourself. Thanks to virtual machines (which are clonable without much hassle) you can just do your experiments without fear of breaking anything critical. I did just that pretty often (things like uninstalling glibc is obviously not a smart thing to do – but there are moments you just want to know what exactly will happen if you do it anyway!). I’ve been breaking things out of curiosity sometimes (and aware of what I was about to do) but most of the time by accident or ignorance.

I had already been interested in how programs are being packaged and how the various distributions were made. Soon the question arose: “How do you actually start a distribution?” I read what I could find on that topic and went back as far as possible to the beginning of some of the big distros. Then I tried to imagine how things really started and begun to grow. I finally got hooked by the idea to try this out for myself. It wouldn’t need to be something special – maybe not even something useful in the narrow sense of it. Just the result of a little playing around and a personal project for the sake of learning how you do it.

Linux From Scratch (LFS) would be an excellent thing to begin with, I thought. And since I had been reading a lot on the net I figured that I might as well share my experience with the project. The worst thing that could happen would be that nobody cared for it but probably a few people might find it informative. I decided that it wouldn’t hurt to just give it a try as well. However I never completed LFS since I soon became distracted by plenty of other things!

During my preparations (I was just reading the Filesystem Hierarchy Standard (FHS) since I had always found the filesystem organization a bit confusing) I begun to wonder if I really should just build a distro “by the book” (which LFS is literally all about) or if that wouldn’t mean a missed chance to do something else at the same time. There were a few things with every distro that I wasn’t happy with. Wouldn’t it be a good idea then to build an experimental distro which tried to do things differently in those cases? I decided to create a free blog and just start with it (and see if I have the discipline to stick with it). When I talked to Pheak about my ideas he liked them and joined the project. So far we’ve worked on it independently and he remained more or less in the background, helping me out when I ran into problems and giving suggestions.

The project

Pheak and I decided that the goal for project EERIE (short for “Elementary energy-efficient resource-saving internet experiment” ;)) would be to come up with the base for an experimental desktop distro. So its primary task was and is conducting a series of tests to find a base suitable for it. Also a subproject emerged from the desktop environment tests: The DDD (Desktop Demo DVD). It’s all about bringing as many DEs as possible together on one live medium so that anybody interested in it can easily try them out and compare them to each other.

What has been accomplished so far? A lot actually.

  • I started with describing how I came to Linux (more or less to get familiar with blogging at all)
  • and by offering a few thoughts on Linux for desktop use.
  • First I tried to do my tests with Gentoo but eventually changed to Arch (which Pheak admittedly proposed right from the start).
  • The desktop tests were published in a series of 5 posts (dealing with 3 – 5 DEs each!).
  • Then the various toolkits were discussed and compared briefly.
  • After that I wrote about live cd creation on Arch and released the first alpha version of the “DDD”.
  • The next posts contained thoughts about which applications are crucial for a desktop distribution.
  • Following this I posted comparisons of Qt-based programs to find out which were the most light-weight ones.
  • While I intended to release a new version of the “DDD” and then go on with the GTK applications I postponed these topics and wrote about something I was just messing with at that time: Other Unix-like systems and their Arch variants.
  • And last but not least I managed to get an interview with the EDE (a FLTK-based light-weight DE) developer!

But that’s not all. There are a few other things I kept silent about. While I won’t reveal anything yet, let me tell you that these mean going a huge step beyond of what has been done so far (just doing tests and such)! πŸ™‚

The blog

I’ve already taken a look back after 3 month and after 6 month. I’m quite happy that the trend of more and more visitors coming here has continued.

There are days with more and days with fewer hits but there has not been a single day this year without any visitors. In the 12 month it has existed so far, the blog already scored well over 3,600 hits (exactly 3,625 as I’m writing this)!

Number of daily visitors, etc.

While the weekly hits are of course also fluctuating a bit, they cover a much longer period of time and thus show pretty well that overall the number of hits is increasing. As if it were called for this week is an exceptionally good one.

Weekly hits and visitors

While last year saw November scratching at the 300 hits per month mark, January and February have crossed it. March then stormed forward, skipping 400 hits and coming close to 500! And since June is not over yet – maybe it’ll be the first month to exceed 500?

Monthly hits statistics

So far I got visitors from 85 (!) countries in the world, 7 of which have over 100 hits. Here’s the top countries 30:

Visitors by country

Also the average hits have increased steadily. The best month last year was November with 10 average hits per day; currently it looks like June has doubled this with 20 hits per day on average! The number of total hits has even more than doubled when we compare the six month of last year and of this year. 2,600 hits alone in the first half-year of 2013 – and counting!

Daily and monthly averages

I can only say that I’m very impressed by these values. Of course I had hoped that some people cared for what I post here (especially since I’ve put quite a few hours of work into it). But even in my wildest dreams I would not have hoped for well over 3,500 visitors in the first year! I also didn’t dare to think I would be able to write 3 posts every month (on average). 36 posts so far – I think that’s a nice achievement.

But none of all that is what actually makes me happy the most. While hits were also increasing before, I was really missing feedback. Now I’ve finally got my first comments and thanks to that got in touch with another light-weight FOSS enthusiast (and we’re discussing the details of something I’m looking forward to reveal to you later this year)!

What else can I tell you? Well, you probably already know it, but few days ago I, too, was witness to the fact that spam really is EVIL!!!!!!!!!1111one For proof just look here:

666 – the number of the spam!

And just like in my two previous retrospect posts here are some of the (funny or unusual) search engine terms which lead to the blog:

  • qt3 games for linux
  • game windows 95
  • archbsd pacstrap fails
  • “dos gui” tool download
  • ede live cd
  • best fltk based applications
  • extraordinary linux distro
  • fltk webkit
  • eeire linux
  • windows 2000 control panel
  • installing archhurd
  • xfdos forum
  • “nowadays” distribution with trinity desktop
  • future of linux desktop 2013
  • windows 3.11 wallpaper
  • fltk 3.0
  • energy efficient linux
  • how to start plasma from tty2
  • 56647680 b to mb
  • fltk vs fox vs tk
  • xfdos
  • linux exotic desktop distribution

What’s next?

So what can you expect from EERIE in the future? Of course official announcements of what I made hints of above. Other than that I want to resume work on the “DDD” and get the tests with the GTK+ applications done. Not sure in which order.

And then there’s of course a lot of other things to investigate when planing a new distro. Which standard C library to use? Which compiler to build with? Which package management system to choose? There’s enough to do so we won’t get bored!