Neunix: Eerie transitioning to Geminispace

Regarding my previous post some witty people may have figured that this was a joke: The last post before that one was the long delayed February one and I wrote that I simply couldn’t post the next one (as I cannot stand the new WP editor). That could make said previous post the April one. Maybe it was meant for April 1st?

No, it wasn’t. I’m serious with my experiment of giving it a try to continue writing BSD and IT material in general in Geminispace. The plan is to continue to announce new posts on this platform but to provide the actual content in the new place.

Making a new home

So what’s the status of this? Well, it’s ready! I’ve contacted one of the people behind Gemini and was given access to a server that would host my new Gemlog for now (thanks solderpunk!). A first version of my capsule (in Web-speech this would be “homepage”) is up and available. It currently looks like this:

Capsule of kraileth - my new home on Gemini
Capsule of kraileth – my new home in Geminispace

I got the nice color scheme for my browser from Samsai and generally recommend his introduction article to people who are interested in Gemini.

Took me a day or so to get used to the reduced markup that is called gemtext. But now it’s working out well for the most part. There are some downsides that I’ll probably write about sometime in the future, but in general it works and it’s simplicity makes up for quite a refreshing experience.

Eerielinux blog -> Neunix Gemlog

I’ve picked a new name for the reboot of my previous blogging project. What was the eerielinux blog before is now the Neunix Gemlog. A few things changed or will change, but in general it’s a continuation of what I did with Eerie: I’ll publish articles that I hope are useful or at least interesting to some people.

Focus will remain *BSD-related material but like before I’ll write about other things as they arise. Of course I have some ideas for article series as well. I’ve also picked some old posts from Eerie and converted them (work to transfer more is ongoing).

This is what it looks like right now:

The Neunix index page - continuation of the eerielinux blog in Geminispace
The Neunix index page – continuation of the eerielinux blog in Geminispace

How to access it?

All nice and pretty, but how to you access this thing? Well, Gemini is a protocol wildly different from HTTP and is not currently supported by any mainstream web browser. It is a superset of what HTTP does, though and Gemtext is a superset of what HTML does, so it’s very much possible to convert one to the other – at least in the direction of simpler to more complex! Proxies that make Gemini content accessible via the Web already exist.

So you have two options:

1) Get a real Gemini browser. There are multiple projects out there. I might write about this topic at a later point in time. For now I can only point you to doing a little research and find one that suits you. I use Castor and find it pretty nice.

Then point your Gemini client to: gemini://gemini.circumlunar.space/users/kraileth/neunix

2) Use a web proxy, e.g. this one.

What’s next?

I’ve already posted one new article on Neunix. In about a week or so when people had time to read this one, I’ll link to it directly with a new post on this platform.

And then? Well, we’ll see. The journey has begun and there’s vast, untamed land before me. The possibilities are next to endless. I’ll just pick one thing as the mood strikes me.

Retreat… and reboot! Is there life outside of the Web?

Dear readers,

the time has come for some fundamental re-organization of my EerieLinux blog. The impact of this year’s pandemic as well as family matters (a new family member that demands quite a bit of care!) have forced me to post-pone many of my posts that I usually published at least monthly. Right when I was getting back on track and stated that I intended to publish the missed articles (I’ve written them after all but didn’t find the time for final editing) something else happened.

No, to be honest, it has been happening for quite a while. I didn’t like it but had to cope with it as there was nothing I could do about that, anyway. What am I talking about? Well, the sad fact that I would call the “degradation of the Web”.

EerieLinux has always been about some experiments that I did and wanted to share in case anybody was interested. Now I’m in for a new experiment, a somewhat radical one (and what could be considered radical after going Linux-only and later FreeBSD-only for all of my machines?). I would appreciate feedback on the path that I choose to give a try. What do you think about it? Are you interested in that, too? Would you continue to read some of my material or does this mean that our ways will part? But let’s detail first what has made the time ripe for what is less of an elitist move then an act of mere desperation.

What’s wrong with the Web?

So, what has happened? And what’s the gripe that I have with the Web? Well… It’s actually not just the Web (read: WWW), it’s more things coming together. There seems to be a general direction that the IT world is heading which I don’t approve of. This blog is powered by WordPress for the simple reason that when I started in 2012 I had some material that I wanted to share with the world and going with a free plan on a blog hosting platform seemed like a nice way to get started quickly. And it was. Mind the past tense here.

WordPress evolved – which is a good thing in general. It evolved in a way that I loathe, however. There have been all these “new” and “easier” modes for XYZ which were admittedly more shiny and more “modern” than before. But they broke my workflow time and time again – and unfortunately not for the better. I actually like to re-evaluate my workflows, like to challenge my habits. When I was still using Ubuntu Linux I didn’t only give Canonical’s Unity DE a chance, I actually tried to use it before putting it aside because in the end it hindered me more than it helped. I forced myself to use the (then) new graphical TrueOS for half a year and suffered through incompleteness and breakage. I have a fairly high tolerance for things that are… sub-optimal. I’m also rather patient, I think, and I’m surely not a rage-quit type of person. But inevitably there’s this point where I have to admit: “Ok, that’s it, that’s simply too much”.

The same thing happened for WordPress, when they came up with various iterations of “new editors” – which is why I opted to go back to the “old editor” for writing and editing my blog posts. As I returned to finish the next old post however, I found out that the old editor was gone. They had “finally” removed it. Alright, so I had to try and get accustomed to the new one again. Perhaps it had matured since I tried it last? It had. But it proved to be even more annoying for me than before! I don’t know what the designers are thinking – certainly not what I do. For me it is a pain to work with the new tool: Things that worked perfectly fine before are gone and the new options are so much inferior to what we had before… And this is not even the worst thing that made me give up when I was more than half through with polishing the next post.

Technically the new editors work well for small posts. I seem to have a bit more to say than the average blogger, though; and here’s a very frustrating issue: When editing longer posts, the editor gets unresponsive and laggy. Yuck! Trading a working one for a “new” one that does less but eats up so much more resources? Are you freaking kidding me? Oh, right, that’s the way things go, I forgot for a second. There’s something within my very self that refuses to accept the lack of sanity around me, sorry. I should know better by now.

And even though WordPress makes up a quite large portion of today’s Web, that’s just the tip of the iceberg. All this JS nonsense, megs and megs of useless graphics, animations, tracking and spying cookies, etc. pp. make the Web such a obnoxious place! And don’t even get me started on the situation with web browsers…

What’s wrong with hardware?

After my little rant I can hear people say: “See, pal… If the WordPress editor makes your system struggle enough that you complain on the net, you reaaally want to get a new PC! There’s machines with more than 4 gigs of memory today, you know.”

The irony here is: I did get a newer laptop – and went back to primarily use the old one! Why? Because the new one is bugging me just too much whereas the older model works well for me. The newer follows that stupid trend of being extremely thin. “Thanks” to that design no DVD drive fits in there. While this is incredibly dumb, I can live with it. Carrying an external drive with me is not so much of a problem, but still the fact that the machine is missing the drive annoys me. The bigger problem: The battery of the old model can easily be removed and I can carry a second one with me e.g. on longer train rides. With the new one I’d need to open the case to access it! WTF HP? And finally: Some idiot decided that the “cool” flat design was so important that it’s thinner than the jack for an Ethernet connector… Yes, really: There’s some kind of… hatch that I need to pull down to make the opening big enough to insert the plug! If I remove the plug the hatch snaps back up. It’s not hard to see that this brain-dead construction is prone to defects. And really, it didn’t take too long until it stopped working reliably and I’m randomly losing connectivity every other day… Sorry, this is garbage. Plain as that.

I have another older laptop – that one has 24 GB of RAM and two hard drives. Nice, eh? Not so much because it also has some of those gross EFI quirks. When one of the drives has a GPT partition scheme applied to it, that drive won’t even be detected by the POST anymore! So on that machine I’m stuck with MBR which is not so much fun if you’re using ZFS and want to encrypt your pool with GELI – it can be done, but the workarounds have the side-effects of not working with Boot Environments! True garbage again.

“Come on, why don’t you simply get a different model then?” Yeah, right. As I said, I type a lot, so I have some demands concerning the keyboard. Unfortunately some manufacturers seem to take pride in coming up with new ways of f*cking up the keyboard layout. There are models that simply dropped the CAPS LOCK key, because nobody uses that, right? Wrong! There are people who remap their keys, and being a NEO² typist (a keymap that allows for 6 layers) I need that key as an additional modifier! Take it away and that keyboard is utterly useless to me. But don’t current models like the X1 Carbon still have CAPS LOCK? They do, but there’s another oddity: They swap the CTRL and FN keys! Having CTRL as the leftmost key on the keyboard that I use as my daily driver and switching around in my head at 3 AM when there’s an alarm during my on-call duty is something I fail to do properly. I used a Thinkpad for about a month for on-call and it drove me completely mad. Sorry Lenovo. Your laptops may be excellent otherwise, but they are not for me.

Oh, and it’s not so much of a secret that the situation with the x86 and x86_64 architectures is abysmal (need I say more than Meltdown / Spectre?). Modern hardware design is fundamentally broken and I cannot say that I completely trust the fixes and what unknown side-effects they might bring with them either. But that’s not even the point. We’re stuck with market-leading technology that has been criticized as crappy right from the start. It has come a long way since then, but it’s not a great technology in any regard. I’ve been playing with my Pinebook and it might have the potential to become something different. Maybe the Open Source PowerPC notebook initiative will succeed. Probably we’ll have something RISC-V-based in the long run. But right now we have to make use of what is available to us.

Can’t the Web be saved?

I’m a somewhat optimistic person, but in this regard not so much. While I have thought about just self-hosting my blog and using a nice static-site generator or something, that would only solve my issues regarding the blog. A huge portion of the Web will still be a terrible place. Browsers and software will still suck hard. Especially in terms of browsers I’ve found even the suckless offering far from being a good one (I like their work and agree with most of the suckless principles, but in my conclusion it’s not enough to really get me out of this whole mess).

Sure, I can install e.g. the Dillo browser. But its development has been extremely slow for years and the subset of HTML that it supports cannot render most of today’s websites properly. And going with just the pages of people who deliberately keep their sites simple? I like the idea, but there’s the problem that no real community (that I know of) exists which agrees on a single standard of which HTML features are ok and which ones should be avoided.

I’m old enough to remember the browser wars well enough. I also confess being guilty of having used “marquee” on my homepage for a while back in the day. Maybe all of the gibberish we’re facing today is a late punishment for sins committed when we were younger? I don’t know.

So – are we doomed? Should we just pull the plug, go to real libraries again, buy books when we need information and spend our free time in the garden? That thought is tempting only for a moment. I love tech. I love the net and the possibilities it brings with it. Plus I’m kind of a liberal today who believes that mankind will eventually make something good from it all. We’re on this planet to play, to learn and to grow. Some insights can only be gained the hard way. It’s ok that commercial interests ruined the Web for people like me. There are other people who have (monetary or idealistic) interests in the Web being like it is. That’s fine. And in fact: Today’s Web “works” for a lot of people who either have no clue why it’s problematic in the first place or who simply don’t care. Which is a legitimate stance. The tragedy is simply that the rest of us has kind of lost home for a while and we haven’t been able to find a new one, yet.

The “Big Internet” vs. the “Small Internet”

While the Web makes up for a very large and definitely the most visible part of the Internet, there are niches, lesser known parts of it which are certainly not less interesting. Some people speak of the Web as the “Big internet” and call the various special parts the “Small Internet”.

One such niche is the so-called Gopherspace. Gopher is a simple communication protocol for documents which predates the Web. Not just by today’s standards it’s primitive – but it works. And while the major browsers either never supported it or removed support long ago (e.g. Firefox dropped Gopher support for release 4.0), it’s still kept alive by enthusiasts. Some sources even suggest that it has seen moderate growth over the last years with more people fed up with the Web trying out something different. If you’re interested, start here with the web proxy or do some research on your own and install a Gopher client.

I’ve dug into various Gopher holes and my experience with it is a mixed bag. On the one hand it’s really cool to see people putting in the effort of creating a place that’s worthwhile to visit. I also liked the experience in general: It’s not bells and whistles everywhere (because that’s in fact impossible due to the protocols limitations) but rather a focus on the actual content. People have found ways to access git repositories over Gopher and there’s a community called Bitreich (via Gopher) that declared “suckless failed” and propose an even more radical approach. While some of it is probably parody, it’s an interesting one.

On the other hand some of the restrictions of the protocol make no sense at all today, like having a hard-coded limit of 80 characters per line. And there are more shortcomings. When Gopher was conceived, nobody thought of internationalization and indicating the charset that a document uses. Also Gopher is all plain-text and does not provide any means to help protect your privacy – which does not exactly make it overly appealing to me.

But there’s something else, an even smaller – but newer – niche, called Project Gemini. It is a newly designed protocol (2019!) that wants to provide kind of a middle ground between Gopher and the Web while clearly leaning towards the former. It remedies the privacy issues by making TLS mandatory and deliberately not supporting “user agents” or other ways to collect data about the user not required to deliver the content. And it wants to simply be an additional option for people to use not to replace either Gopher or the Web.

While I kind of like Gopher, I really admire Gemini. Having the balls to even try to actually do something like this in our time is simply (no pun intended) astonishing. In my opinion it’s high time to re-invent the wheel. Gemini is certainly not a panacea to all the problems that we have today. But it’s a much welcome (for me at last) chance to start fresh without that huge, huge bag of problems that we’re carrying on with the Web but with the experience that we gained from using it for several decades now.

What’s next?

My experiment is to move Eerielinux to Geminispace and post new content there as I find the time. The plan is to keep this WordPress blog and to create new posts here that simply reference the real content, providing a convenient link using a Web proxy. That should help keeping things accessible for people who prefer to stick with their known browsers instead of getting another one for such a tiny little world as Geminispace is right now.

And who knows? Perhaps something nice comes from Gemini in the long run. I’m looking forward to find out. And if you care — see you in Geminispace for some more articles on *BSD, computers and tech in general!

Should you abandon Linux and switch to *BSD?

The popularity of Linux skyrockets these days: More and more companies adapt it and even the just-above-average who doesn’t accept the imposition that is called “Windows 10” is often open to try it out. However at the same time, the popularity of said System seems to be fading among some of the more technical people, operating system enthusiasts and even followers of the FLOSS ideology.

Just recently an article called Why you should migrate everything from Linux to BSD was published and it has caught some attention and even replies like this one (it makes false claims like ZFS not being available on NetBSD and such, though.)

There have always been some posts like this, this is nothing too special. What I think is new, however, is the frequency that you can find discussions like this. Also the general tone has changed. Just a couple of years ago most Linux users wouldn’t even have bothered to comment such a thing. Today they seem to be much more open to learning about alternatives or in fact looking for something better than what they have. So what’s wrong with Linux?

It’s not about Systemd (alone)…

There are a lot of perfectly valid technical reasons to not want to use Systemd on your Linux system. But none of those could ever be an excuse for the hatred that this project has attracted. However there is a pretty simple explanation for that phenomenon: It’s how somebody is acting all high and mighty, simply dismissing valid critics and being a great example for a person with an arrogant attitude.

We have a lot of… let’s say… difficult persons it tech. Sometimes you think they have no manners, are being jerks or greatly overestimate their knowledge in certain fields. That’s ok and in fact they often are somewhat brilliant in a certain area. Most of us have learned to live with that.

And then there are people who think that they can dictate the one way to go. Well, there are project leaders who actually can do that due to being widely respected. But sometimes it’s different. Now when somebody wants to take something away from you (or he really doesn’t but you get the impression), you are likely to stand upon your defense.

Now when all of that unites in one person, you have the perfect boogeyman. Then all the technical aspects lose in weight and the feeling takes over. Which is not to say that feeling is not an important factor: If you don’t feel comfortable with Linux anymore, it might be time to move on.

The GNOME factor

The GNOME desktop is well known among *nix desktop users. It suits the needs some people but not others. That’s fine and there would not be any problem at all. However GNOME has a certain reputation which is not that nice… Why? Not because they didn’t accept some feature requests. Also not because are being ignoramuses when it comes to systems that are not so mainstream. No. They are notorious for cutting features that have already existed! This is what makes a lot of people mad.

I was a GNOME user myself and remember pretty well how I liked the file manager. To my dismay they removed so many features which I needed that the application became useless for me. I didn’t want to go looking for something else, but I was eventually forced to as the situation became unbearable. As I’m more of a calm guy, I didn’t go off at insult anybody, but other people did. And things got worse…

Today I’m a former GNOME user. This is *nix and not Windows. Nobody can force tiles upon us against our will. Yes, some projects think they know better than their users and that leads to the latter becoming upset. But as long as there are alternatives, we can move on.

Clumsy leaders

Recently Linus Torvalds spoke out against ZFS. Being the Linux “inventor” he has earned a lot of respect among the *nix community. I also used to hold him in high esteem despite his often ignoble behavior. However over the course of the last few years, I’ve lost a lot of respect for him.

The ZFS statement was the last coffin nail for me. He says that he always found ZFS more of a “buzzword” than anything else and that “benchmarks” didn’t make it look that good anyway. This is so far off the shot that I’m ashamed to ever have considered him a technical genius. He obviously does have no idea at all what problem ZFS actually solves! Speed benchmarks are all nice and well, but they are not why people want ZFS! And of course it’s far from being a buzzword – if you have valuable data today, you almost certainly want to bet on ZFS.

But not only is he ok with judging what he has not even bothered to take a look at from closer that several hundred meters – he’s also making completely stupid claims that make him look like a terribly ridiculous figure. According to Mr. Torvalds, ZFS had “no real maintenance behind it either any more”.

Ouch! He hasn’t even heard about OpenZFS, I’d guess. If you’re not in a closed-Solaris environment, this is what people are referring to when they say “ZFS”. Nobody outside the small, isolated isle of Oracle has any interest in ClosedZFS. Yes, Oracle laid off most of their Solaris staff and nobody knows if there is any noteworthy future for that OS. But not too long Solaris 11.4 was released – so even if Linus referred to the situation at Oracle, he’s not exactly right. In the case of OpenZFS, however, he could not be more wrong.

The OpenZFS is as alive as it could be. There are regular leadership meetings, many new features are being developed – and just recently a common repository for both Linux and FreeBSD was created, with other operating systems expected to join in! This is a moment of glory for collaboration in Open Source, but Linus didn’t hear a thing – or did he not want to hear anything? The fact that the second-in-command, GKH, has attacked ZFS about a year ago in a pretty questionable way, too, does not bode well.

Why do people leave Linux?

There have always been compelling technical reasons why you would choose *BSD over Linux (e.g. the complete operating system approach, much more consistent design, etc.). But I’d say that lately the the feeling part of it became much more important.

I left Linux because I was so sick and tired of the stupid fights between the hardcore fans of one distro or another and the unbearable arrogance of many. Yes, I also had the feeling that Linux was heading down the wrong way, too. I simply was no longer really happy with it and ready to try something new. There was a learning curve for sure, but the FreeBSD community is extremely friendly and while there are of course also people getting into disputes, I got the feeling that I described as “BSD is for grown-ups”. Not saying that there aren’t any really bright people in the Linux community, but on average I feel that the BSD users are more technical.

Others have stated similar reasons. The primary developer of ClonOS (that strives to be for FreeBSD what Proxmox is for Linux) wrote this:

According to the authors of the project, Linux is no longer a member of the common people, it is fully controlled by big commercial organization. while FreeBSD is developed mostly by enthusiasts. Today, Linux – it is a commercial machine for making money – is that it was Microsoft Windows in 90 years. While many Linux users have struggled against the Windows monopoly (CBSD author of one of them).

Yes, FreeBSD very far behind in their characteristics in comparing to Linux. Just look at the abundance of such powerfull decisions as the OpenVZ, Docker, Rancher, Kubernetis, LXD, Ceph, GlusterFS, OpenNebula, OpenStack, Proxmox, ISPPanel and a dozen others. All this is created by commercial companies for Linux and this is done very well. However, Linux is oversaturated with similar solutions. Therefore, it’s much more interesting to create it on FreeBSD, where nothing like that exists. This is an excellent challenge to improve and fix in FreeBSD.

We all love independence and freedom and FreeBSD today – an independent and free operating system, which is in the hands of ordinary people.

They are not alone. Even convinced followers of the FSF ideas have come to the conclusion that Linux may not be the right platform for them anymore. The people behind Hyperbola GNU/Linux have announced this:

Due to the Linux kernel rapidly proceeding down an unstable path, we are planning on implementing a completely new OS derived from several BSD implementations. This was not an easy decision to make, but we wish to use our time and resources to create a viable alternative to the current operating system trends which are actively seeking to undermine user choice and freedom.

This will not be a “distro”, but a hard fork of the OpenBSD kernel and userspace including new code written under GPLv3 and LGPLv3 to replace GPL-incompatible parts and non-free ones.

Reasons for this include:

Linux kernel forcing adaption of DRM, including HDCP.
Linux kernel proposed usage of Rust (which contains freedom flaws and a centralized code repository that is more prone to cyber attack and generally requires internet access to use.)
Linux kernel being written without security and in mind. (KSPP is basically a dead project and Grsec is no longer free software)
Many GNU userspace and core utils are all forcing adaption of features without build time options to disable them. E.g. (PulseAudio / SystemD / Rust / Java as forced dependencies)

As such, we will continue to support the Milky Way branch until 2022 when our legacy Linux-libre kernel reaches End of Life.

Will *BSD be a better OS for you?

So the big question is: If you are a Linux user, should you make the switch, too? I won’t unconditionally say yes. It really depends.

Are you happy with the overall situation in Linux? In that case there’s no need to migrate anything over. However you might still want to give a BSD of your choice a try. Perhaps you find something that you like even better? If you spend a bit of time exploring a BSD, you will find that several problems can be solved in other ways than those you are familiar with. And that will likely make you a better Linux admin, even if you decide to stick with it. Or maybe you’ll want to use the best tool for the job which could sometimes be Linux and sometimes a BSD. Getting to know a somewhat similar but also at times quite different *nix system will enable you to make an informed choice.

Not happy with Linux anymore in the recent years? Try out a BSD. If you need help to decide which one might be for you, I’ve written an article about that topic, too. Do a bit of reading, then install that BSD in a VM and explore. If you go with FreeBSD, make sure you take a look at the handbook (probably also available in your language) as that is a great source of information and one thing that sets FreeBSD apart from almost all Linux distros.

If you find that you like what you found, make a list of your requirements and find out if your BSD would indeed fulfill your needs. If it doesn’t, consider alternatives. Once the path is clear, I recommend to take a look at the community, too. For example there’s the weekly BSDNow! podcast that’s very informative. A lot of people have already written in, confessing that they are still Linux users only, but the topics of the show got them still hooked.

Do not rush things. Did you start with Linux or have you migrated e.g. from Windows? If you did come from a different OS, remember that there have been frustrating moments when you were all new to Linux and had certain misconceptions. You will be going through that again, but looking at the final outcome it will likely be a pretty rewarding journey.

Also don’t be shy and ask others if you don’t have the time or will to figure out everything yourself. The BSD people are usually pretty approachable and helpful. Feel free to ask me questions here, I might be able to give some answers.

It has been a couple of years now since I replaced the last machine that ran Linux at home. Would I choose to make the switch after all the experience that I gained since then? Oh yes! Anytime.

A glimpse into 2020

When you read this, the old year will be over (well, depending on the time zone you live in). If we’re lucky, this might be the year to get our hands on the first affordable RISC-V hardware that can actually run a Unix-like operating system. It should definitely be the year to get interesting devices like the ARM64-based PinePhone. And it also means that Python 2 is finally dead.

Speaking about that: For me 2019 has been a pretty busy year. On this blog I wrote about quite some different topics, among them my first attempt at writing something programming-related as I tried to teach myself a little bit of Python. If I had to name an overall theme, I’d say that the past year was the year of hardware architectures. I didn’t plan this, but that’s what’s happened. But I don’t actually want to look back in this post. On the contrary! But speaking of dead things also kind of fits into the next topic (more than I like…)!

FreeBSD on SPARC64

The next post that I plan to write will be about FreeBSD on the SPARC64 architecture. What I did not know when I decided on that is that it is more or less a doomed architecture when it comes to FreeBSD. SPARC64 is in grave danger – people expect support for it to be dropped before FreeBSD 13.0 is released!

The reason is that it is one of the architectures that still need the old GCC 4.2 (yes, from 2007!) toolchain – and that old cruft finally has to go. And while everybody agrees that this is a completely sensible thing to do, SPARC64 doesn’t seem to have as many friends among the FreeBSD developers to make the transition to something newer. A few people are trying to get something done (I’m also tinkering and trying to help), but it’s far from a save bet that it’ll succeed.

IMHO it would be a real shame to see FreeBSD on SPARC64 die. If it does survive, I’ll definitely try to help with QA. Can you help? If so: Please do! I’ll give more details on what the current status is and where the problems are in my January post.

FreeBSD on ARM64

I plan on writing another post about the current status on FreeBSD on ARM64. The topic of making it a Tier 1 architecture has recently been brought up again and I’d like to join the discussion about that rather sooner than later. If it wasn’t for the very unpleasant situation with SPARC64, this would actually be my next post.

Progress has been made on the networking issues on the Cavium ThunderX servers and I’ll also take a look again at the PineBook. Most likely I’ll also buy a PinePhone and/or one of their Tablets. If I do, you will find a review here.

Orchestration and Configuration Management with SaltStack

I wanted to write about this topic for a while, but now I’ve at last started to set aside the hardware that I need for the project. Several years ago (gosh…) I wrote a little comparison of Puppet, Chef, Salt and Ansible. After a general introduction I might update and publish this as well.

But that will only be the start of a series of posts introducing Salt. There will be a slight focus on FreeBSD, but in general it will show off how to work with various operating systems and distributions. We’ll start with Salt-SSH using Remote Execution Modules, talk about targeting and get to know grains. Then we’ll progress to the state system, pillar data and so on before switching to the master-minion model.

I’m looking forward to this one. If anybody has any ideas – just tell me, I’m open to suggestions on what to cover.

HardenedBSD

While I ran this derivative of FreeBSD for a couple of weeks on spare hardware (until I needed that for something else), I just didn’t find the time to write about my experience with it, yet. I liked it, though, and plan on re-visiting the OS. And when I do, you’ll read about it here for sure.

The project is currently being re-structured. So I’ll wait with this topic for a while longer. Might happen in the second half of the year (time flies by much too fast, anyway).

E-Mail

For years now I’ve been putting this one off. In fact I’ve started digging a bit into the topic twice. Two times I got distracted with other topics. Maybe third time is the charm?

To help making this more likely, I registered a domain (with a pretty bad pun in German) in December. Maybe now that I pay money, I’ll actually live up to the plan to “do moar with mail”. I’ll be using BSD technology where possible. So expect that the mailing stuff will involve OpenSMTPd.

illumos

This one is really a time issue. I’m still very much interested in the heritage of OpenSolaris and would like to do some more things with it. However I have no idea when I’ll find the time to do a dedicated illumos project. But there will definitely be some illumos involved with one of the other topics. You guess which one! 😉

Ravenports

The Ravenports project is still as fascinating to me as it was when I discovered it. I really wish I could dedicate more time to porting and helping to bring things forward (there’s still quite a lot of ports missing that I’d like to have and use).

While things are going well in general and ports are being updated really, really fast most of the time, big changes are rare right now. But big changes are what it makes sense to write about. And while there are some noteworthy things that I can think of, I’m still waiting for something else to land. Once that happens I will dedicate another post to Raven.

Linux vs. FreeBSD

I recently needed to setup a new Linux machine for a customer. Usually my co-workers do that, since I volunteered to take care of our BSD machines. That installation left me totally puzzled. Has the Debian installer become worse – or does my memory fail me and it has always been so bad (and I didn’t notice when I was into Linux only)?

Since then I thought about a few things. The conclusion is that I really love FreeBSD. It’s not perfect (well, nothing is), but there are so many areas where it’s much, much more comfortable to work with (can you say iptables or mdadm? Yuck!). And there is a lot more beauty and even technical genius if you take a closer look and compare things.

Yes, Linux in much more advanced in many areas. But that’s not much of a surprise given how much more manpower goes into that system. But it is a little miracle how the BSDs with their much lower manpower continue to deliver excellent operating systems on par with or even superior to Linux when it comes to sanity of use. Thank you, *BSD!

Happy new year!

So that’s what I have on my mind right now (I’m not out of ideas, but these are the topics that are on the top of my “would like to write about” list currently). Which of these topics will I be able to deliver and which will I miss? Time will tell. Feel free to comment and tell me what interests you the most.

Happy new year to all of my readers!

Eerie Linux: 5 years of bloggin’!


The Eerie Linux blog silently turned 5 years just last month. I thought a while about what kind of anniversary post I should write to celebrate the fifth birthday. I was even thinking of closing the blog on that day or at least announce that I would no longer be able to write posts regularly. I decided against it. While I don’t make any promises, I will try to keep the blog up for now.

The June marathon

In the end I decided not just to hold back that birthday post (this one) but do something special instead: Write a full article every five days! It was a lot of work, but June 2017 saw 6 posts each with over 1,600 words on average with one just falling short on 2,000. I put a lot of detail into those posts and also included quite some pictures.

It has been a fun experience but also an exhausting one. I have always been pressed for time and even though I tried to create as much material on weekends if the targeted date was during the week. Still I almost never managed to complete a whole article before the day it was due and often had to finish it in the late hours of evening after work. But now it’s done and I’m happy about that! 😉

5 years of blogging

A lot has happened in the last 5 years. When I started the blog in June 2012, I had quite some time on my hands but I wasn’t sure if I would always find enough topics to write about. This has changed completely. Free time is pretty scarce these days but there’s just so much going on in technology and related areas that I have a very, very long list of things that I’d like to write about – and that list grows faster than I can write and publish articles.

I’ve also moved houses three times over these years – and still haven’t missed a single month completely. Each and every month has had at least one new article and I’m a bit proud of that because a lot of times it really hasn’t been easy.

Since 2013 every year I get most page hits from the US with Germany being second. Ranks 3+ vary.

2012

After thinking about starting a blog for over a year, in 2012 I actually started it. I had been using SuSE and Ubuntu Linux on the desktop for a while and wanted to know more about the operating system. And I figured that it would make sense to pick an ambitious but realistic project and write about it as the journey continued.

In my first half-year I wrote 24 posts introducing myself, finding a suitable distro (looking info Gentoo first but then settling for Arch), thoughts on graphical toolkits and so on. The most important articles were part of a series on installing and comparing 20 Linux desktop environments.

The 6 month of 2012 saw just over 1,000 page views and I even got my first “likes” and comments. However I had no idea if I was doing good for a blog of that kind. Considering that it was public and that the whole world could potentially visit the blog, it seemed pretty low. Especially if you consider the many hours that went into the posts. “There must be thousands of Linux blogs out there and who should read them all?”, I thought. But I went on doing what I was doing because of my own interest in Linux topics. And I also continued to blog about it. If somebody would read and enjoy it: Execllent. If not it had at least made me write an English text which is quite valuable for the non-native speaker.

2013

In retrospective, 2013 was an interesting year. I got the most comments and “likes” that I ever got in a single year. And page hits increased to just over 6,600! You can imagine that I was extremely happy that there actually proved to be some interest in what I was doing. I already had less time now and managed to write 22 posts in the whole year instead of 24 in 6 just months the year before.

I continued to explore and compare applications build with the Qt and GTK toolkits and these proved to be my most popular articles. But I also decided to take a little peek into the bigger world of *nix and have a shy first look at Hurd and BSD. My focus completely remained on Linux, though (little did I know that this would come to an end in the future!). Then I dug into package building and learned a lot by trying to update an old and no longer supported Linux distro. Finally I got my domain elderlinux.org and made the first step towards my original goal: Building my own Linux distribution (you have to have done that once, right? And if only for learning purposes).

2014

In 2014 things started to decline. The page hits raised slightly to over 6,800 but that was it. I published 14 posts, but all top ten most popular ones were written in previous years. I didn’t notice that back in the day, though. I managed to get a wide variety of topics covered, including my first post on hardware (writing about the new RISC-V platform that I still keep an eye on).

The most important achievement of the year was that I completed my Arch:E5 project. My own distribution was Arch-derived but did a lot of things different. It used the de-blobbed Linux libre kernel, was based on a different libc, replaced systemd with runit and used LLVM/Clang as the default compiler among other things. It also used a more modular repository architecture compared to mainline Arch Linux. I took this project pretty far: In the end I had a nice self-hosted distro that even came with two desktop environments to choose from. I learned a lot by doing this but since nobody else seemed to be interested in it (I didn’t reach out on the Arch forums or anything, though, to be honest!), I ended the project, continuing to explore other things.

2015

This was the year things changed. Page hits dropped: With about 6,500 hits fewer people visited my blog than even in 2013. I only wrote one post per month (with the exception of April where it was one April fools article and another setting things straight again). Only two posts of this year made it to the top 10 of most popular posts: One about the “Truly Ergonomic Keyboard” (which obviously brought some people to my blog who would probably not be interested in most other articles that I wrote) and another one that was a “FreeBSD tutorial for Linux users” (that received unusual attention thanks to being featured on FreeBSDNews).

I didn’t intend it to, but 2015 was the first year on the blog that was totally dominated by *BSD topics. Since I had started to seriously explore FreeBSD and OpenBSD, this looks like a natural thing. I wrote an April Fools post about Arch Linux’s Pacman coming to OpenBSD and then tried to prove that actually works. Then a friend asked me about FreeBSD and I decided to write a little introduction series. And then the year was more or less over.

2016

After the disappointment of declining public interest in my blog I didn’t expect much from 2016. Especially as I had been venturing deeper int *BSD territory – and liked it enough to continue writing about it. This was obviously even more niche than Linux and how many people would want to read that stuff, especially from a beginner? I was in for a surprise: the blog got more than 7,100 hits that year with four new posts (all of which were featured on FreeBSDNews) making it into to top 10 this time! I had hoped to reach 7,000 hits in 2014 and after it looked like things weren’t going in a good direction, this was a pretty rewarding experience.

I wrote about various *BSD topics: A howto on setting up a dual-boot FreeBSD/OpenBSD with full disk encryption, a little comparison of documentation in Linux and (Free)BSD, a short introduction to Vagrant and a series on getting started with Bacula on FreeBSD. And finally in December an article on using TrueOS for over three months as my daily driver. This post would spark a lot of interest in 2017, making it the top ranked popular post at the time I write this.

2017

In the first half of this year I have already written 14 articles, including two series that a lot of work went into: The adventures of reviving and updating an ancient FreeBSD 4.11 system with Pkgsrc and building a home router with OPNsense/pfsense. And now after only 6.5 month page hits had already climbed up to over 6,700! Recent 3 month have all totalled in more that 1,000, a mark that I had never reached before.

And that’s all before FreeBSD News, Lobsters and even DragonFlyDigest linked to either my pfSense vs. OPNsense article or even to the whole BSD home router series! That made the stats really skyrocket over the previous two weeks. It definitely looks like there are quite some other people out there that don’t think *BSD is boring!

Current stats

Daily blog stats 07/2017

Before the great rush I was receiving about 20 to 60 page hits each day. The new record is now 425 hits on Jul 18 after Lobste.rs picked up the pfSense vs. OPNsense comparison!

Weekly blog stats 07/2017

Weekly hits were between 140 and 370 between Jan and Jul. And then there was this week that saw 1.200 page hits – this is as much as the whole month of May this year and that was the absolute monthly record before!

Monthly blog stats 07/2017

Between January 2016 and June 2017, the blog received 440 (January ’16) and 1.200 (May ’17) hits. And then July happened with over 2.700 hits!

Yearly blog stats 07/2017

The best blogging year so far had been 2016 with 7.100 hits – now at the end of July 2017, this blog has already seen over 8.800 hits. I’m pretty confident to reach the magic mark of 10.000 this time (wow!).

The future?

Of course I cannot say for sure. But I’ve found my place in the FreeBSD community and made a comfortable home with GhostBSD. After becoming part of the small team that develops this OS, I’ve faced quite some challenges and without any doubt there are more to come. But it is a great learning experience and being a (albeit small) part of it feels very rewarding.

And even though time is a very limiting factor I currently don’t feel like taking a break any longer! I will definitely continue to explore more BSD and write about it. Next station: Some preparations for an article on using jails on the newly installed OPNsense router (or anywhere else!). Thanks for reading – and see you soon.

Top things that I missed in 2015

Another year of blogging comes to an end. It has been quite full of *BSD stuff so that I’d even say: Regarding this blog it has been a BSD year. This was not actually planned but isn’t a real surprise, either. I’ve not given up on Linux (which I use on a daily basis as my primary desktop OS) but it’s clear that I’m fascinated with the BSDs and will try to get into them further in 2016.

Despite being a busy year, there were quite a few things that I would have liked to do and blog about that never happened. I hope to be able to do some of these things next year.

Desktops, toolkits, live DVD

One of the most “successful” (in case of hits) article series was the desktop comparison that I did in 2012. Now in that field a lot has happened since then and I really wanted to do this again. Some desktops are no longer alive others have become available since then and it is a sure thing that the amount of memory needed has changed as well… 😉

Also I’ve never been able to finish the toolkit comparison which I stopped in the middle of writing about GTK-based applications. This has been started in 2013 so it would also be about time. However my focus has shifted away from the original intend of finding tools for a light-weight Linux desktop. I’ve become involved with the EDE project (“Equinox Desktop Environment”) that uses the FLTK toolkit and so people could argue that I’m not really unbiased anymore. Then again… I chose to become involved because that was the winner of my last test series – and chances are that the reasons for it are still valid.

And then there’s the “Desktop Demo DVD” subproject that never really took off. I had an Arch-based image with quite some desktops to choose from but there were a few problems: Trinity could not be installed alongside KDE, Unity for Arch was not exactly in good shape, etc. But the biggest issue was the fact that I did not have webspace available to store a big iso file.

My traffic statistics show that there has been a constant interest in the article about creating an Arch Linux live-CD. Unfortunately it is completely obsolete since the tool that creates it has changed substantially. I’d really like to write an updated version somewhen.

In fact I wanted to start over with the desktop tests this summer and had started with this. However Virtual Box hardware acceleration for graphics was broken on Arch, and since this is a real blocker I could not continue (has this been resolved since?).

OSes

I wrote an article about HURD in 2013, too, and wanted to re-visit a HURD-based system to see what happened in the mean time. ArchHURD has been in coma for quite some time. Just recently there was a vital sign however. I wish the new developer best luck and will surely do another blog post about it once there’s something usable to show off!

The experiments with Arch and an alternative libc (musl) were stopped due to a lack of time and could be taken further. This has been an interesting project that I’d like to continue some time in some form. I also had some reviews of interesting but lesser known Linux distros in mind. Not sure if I find time for that, though.

There has been a whole lot going about both FreeBSD and OpenBSD. Still I would have liked to do more in that field (exploring jails, ZFS, etc.). But that’s things I’ll do in 2016 for sure.

Hardware

I’ve played a bit with a Raspberry 2 and built a little router with it using a security orientated Linux distro. It was a fun project to do and maybe it is of any use to somebody.

One highlight that I’m looking forward to mess with is the RISC-V platform, a very promising effort to finally give us a CPU that is actually open hardware!

Other things

There are a few other things that I want to write about and hope to find time for soon. I messed with some version control tools a while back and this would make a nice series of articles, I think. Also I have something about devops in mind and want to do a brief comparison of some configuration management tools (Puppet, Chef, Salt Stack, Ansible – and perhaps some more). If there is interest in that I might pick it up and document some examples on FreeBSD or OpenBSD (there’s more than enough material for Linux around but *BSD is often a rather weak spot). We’ll see.

Well, and I still have one article about GPL vs. BSD license(s) in store that will surely happen next year. That and a few topics about programming that I’ve been thinking about writing for a while now.

So – goodbye 2015 and welcome 2016!

Happy new year everyone! As you can see, I have not run out of ideas. 🙂

Puffy goes Pacman!

This post reveals a new Arch distribution: ArchBSD/Open! I know that this comes unexpectedly; I was surprised, too, after all. In fact it was just by accident that I learned about the new project that will be officially announced on the OpenBSD Journal any day now.

The new distro’s leaked logo

A bit of background

Arch Linux is a Linux distro that is small, simple and light-weight. And it has pacman! This combination proves to be a real success story. Besides Arch Linux we have today: Arch LinuxARM, ArchBang, ArchHurd and probably even more Arches!

Right, one of these other ones is ArchBSD – I’ve blogged about it almost two years ago. It is still around, so it obviously managed to survive. It’s a nice little distro but there’s one thing wrong with it: The name! Why that? Because it is a FreeBSD distribution and even FreeBSD users admit now and then that this is not the only BSD system out there! Right now all other BSD systems are discriminated against. This is a situation both unacceptable and unbearable which must come to an end immediately! It is a matter of life and deathjuice … justice!

Promised some background, eh? Here’s a daemon police wallpaper!

To reflect the fact that it is not the only BSD, the project totally needs to change the name to ArchBSD/Free.

A petition that will force the maintainers with tens of thousands of signatures will soon be started. Feel free to hop over to their forum and tell them that their project name downright sucks, if you can’t wait. Explain why and start demanding that the project be renamed. And while you are at it, tell ’em that ArchBSD/Free is so much cooler, anyway! It sounds more important, it’s more precise, more fun and more to type!

Puffy loves Pacman

There are three reasons why ArchBSD/Open was created. The first one is: With ArchBSD’s name change to ArchBSD/Free the need arose to provide an ArchBSD/something because otherwise that addition to the name would just sound stupid and be superfluous.

The second one: The world needs more Arch!!

That and the fact that Puffy just loves pacman (well, everybody does, right?)!

With so many good reasons for it, it was just a matter of time until a dedicated team formed to make the dream come true. Now the work for it is finally done and will soon be made public.

Puffy loves pacman!

Release time

Well, while the product is already completed, there’s of course one little detail which blocks the publication. No, it’s not even something technical. Or perhaps it is. Depends on how you look at it. The problem is: The webpage is not done, yet! Yeah, it’s the simple things in life which can cause the biggest trouble.

So what’s the release date? Unfortunately there’s no release date currently. Why? Ok, ok, if you absolutely must know, I’ll tell you. All technical difficulties of bringing Pacman to OpenBSD were solved rather quickly. But despite the team’s best efforts they have not been able to agree on the website design! Er, that is, there is no design, yet, which to agree on…

Think about it for a minute and you’ll see why: FreeBSD’s mascot is Beastie. He’s a daemon with a fork (and rather awkward shoes for whatever reason – probably he just likes them). That’s an easy mascot to work with as it is not hard at all to imagine an Arch daemon: A bigger, badder and probably even redder version of Beastie. But OpenBSD’s mascot is Puffy! Now how on earth does an Arch Blowfish look like and how to come up with a nice theme where it fits in?!

There have been voices inside the team to just make a simple webpage for now and get the release done. The OS was more important than the theme after all. Those ignorants have been kicked off the team of course and their access revoked. That’s a bit harsh? No, not at all! Sorry, this is OpenBSD after all. You cannot make a release without high quality artwork!

Puffy shot first! An example of the very nice OpenBSD artwork

Oh, stop complaining now, will you? If it weren’t for one of the expelled, I wouldn’t have learned about the project’s existence and that means you, too, wouldn’t. Now the big question is: Will ArchBSD/Open ever be released? *sigh* Frankly speaking, I don’t know. I didn’t manage to make contact with the project leader.

But after trying to get in contact for weeks now there’s one thing that I can say for sure: The whole team leaves a rather fishy impression!

Craven New World – or how to ruin the net

Alright. I never expected to write about anything remotely “political” on my blog… It’s about technical things, right? Ok, ok, free software is “political” all by itself. Kind of. But that’s about it.

While at times I’m really sick of what happens on the world, that doesn’t fit well on a blog about computer topics. I admit that I was tempted two or three times to write something about all the blatant and ruthless lies against Russia and things like that. But this is not the right place for those topics. So I resisted. Then came July 1st…

I begun to write a full-sized rant on that day but in the end decided to drop it and re-think things when I got calm again. Since I’m still stunned and angry at the same time, I’ve simply got to write an article now nevertheless.

The one and only

In that morning I read about how Paypal froze ProtonMail’s account. While it is nothing new that Paypal freezes accounts, the rationale was quite interesting. ProtonMail is a provider of email services. What makes them stand out is that they are developing an easy-to-use email system that features end-to-end encryption.

Now it’s a well-known fact that there are powers out there who have no respect at all for your privacy. They want to know where you go, what you download and what you talk about when you mail grandma. You could be a dangerous villain, skilled to pretend the contrary after all – and if they can’t find out what color your underwear is, you might even get away with it!

From that point of view, encryption is… well, irritating to say the least. Which makes it a clear thing that ProtonMail sucks big time. How dare they help people who prefer to keep private things private? So Paypal froze their account, because that company “wasn’t sure whether ProtonMail had approval by the gouvernment” for their business. As a matter of fact, the US have quite a few strange laws. But that’s another thing and it’s perfectly fine if an American company doesn’t wish to assist another American company in doing something unlawful. Except – ProtonMail is not an American company… It’s based in Switzerland!

How can it be that a Swiss company would require US approval for their business? And it’s not even the first time that something like that happens. The USA has blackmailed Switzerland not too long ago. And with their “compliance” ideology they are choking many others, too. This is a very alarming and gross practice. But it is, I cannot repeat it often enough, nothing new.

Just hand it to us!

A while later I read about how Microsoft had just seized more than 20 domains owned by no-ip. This cut off almost two million users from using the no-ip service. And what was the reason for such a draconian action? Was the life of the president at stake? Nope. Was the whole country threatened by some ancient evil perhaps? Not really. It was far worse than that: Microsoft had found a judge which allowed the domain seizure because Microsoft claimed that there were two accounts involved in spreading malware…

This was the moment I had to take a look at the calendar just to make sure that I didn’t mess up things and it was actually April 1st! But no – unfortunately not.

I just want to add that I am not an no-ip user and wasn’t affected personally. But I know people who were – one was even affected enough to finally give Linux more room both for private use and in his company. So while the whole thing is pretty much insane it has its good sides, too. Especially since I expect more people to be really upset after what Microsoft did. Maybe they should rather spend their time fixing their own broken windows than throwing stones at other people’s business?

Oy vey, we want your money!

Ah, what a day. We had some news which were hard to believe if such things weren’t happening over and over again. Then there was some news which left me incredulously shaking my head. What Microsoft did was ludicrous and the fact that some judge ruled in their favor is downright absurd. That cannot possibly be surpassed, can it? Yes. Unfortunately it can.

The last news is just so completely off the scala, that I don’t find any words for it (even in my native language that is). While the Microsoft case makes you question your sanity, the other thing that happened makes you struggle for your faith in mankind. Seriously.

So what happened? Well. More or less this:

Group A (private individuals) who are citizens of
state B (Israel) mandate
organisation C (a jewish law firm) to sue
state D (shiit (!) theocracy Iran) in
state E (the USA) for alleged financial support of
organisation F (sunni (!) Hamas) who are accused of
action G (a terrorist attack) in
territory H (the Gaza stripe) which belongs to
state I (Palestine) as group A claims they have suffered from action G.

Now under normal circumstances you’d laugh at any weirdo who can come up with such an idea – let alone actually carry it out… When you’re finished laughing and wiped the tears out of your eyes, you wish him that he’ll find a good mental doctor.

The story is not over, however. The US court rules in favor of the claimant – and since Iran did what any sane person would do and denies this arrogant impertinence, there’s now the fine (like I said I’m at a loss for words) idea: distrainment of the Iranian TLD (.ir)!!

Come on! Distrain a TLD on the net? Seems like they are really working hard to ruin the net. Congratulations to all those bright people involved.

What’s the world coming to?

In my country (Germany) the phenomena of anti-americanism is on the rise. Many people are in rage because of what the NSA did (and without any doubt continues to do). This is a rather sad thing actually, but in many cases I agree with what people say. The US government is one of the most corrupted an unsound entities of the world. Yet – and that deserves to be emphasized – that doesn’t make all Americans warmongers or liars.

The government in my country is run by criminals as well and so I’m probably not in the best position to complain. After all former chancellor Schröder openly admitted (in one of the biggest newspapers of the country!) that the NATO bombings in Yugoslavia (which he supported) were against international law. By stating so he confessed to be a war criminal – and that had no consequences whatsoever. Funny, isn’t it? And still I’d admit any time that I think of him as a more “honest” person than current chancellor Merkel…

Action!

I’d really like to ask every and all Americans to try hard and reclaim their country. But there’s not too much people who value freedom can do right now. Yet there is one thing we can all do: Start using encryption. Yes, invest that half of an hour to teach your grandmother how to write and read encrypted mail. It’s not that hard.

You are telling me that you have nothing to hide? That’s great! Why? Simple: Same here. It’s great because it is this important little fact that makes us qualify to begin encrypting. Currently it makes you suspect if you use encryption. Well, I can live with that.

I also don’t mind if those who think they absolutely have to know what I mail my grandmother break the encryption. But if they want to, they may well invest quite a bit of effort. If they find it worth the time and resources to learn how much my children have grown since we last visited her, that’s fine for me. If everybody used encryption it would be a normal activity. Let’s aim for that!

So – what about you?

Eerie’s second birthday!

Today is the first day of my third blogging year. It’s hard to believe that it has been two years already but I checked the date of the first post: 06/24/2012. So it is really true. Two years are a long time and since the last birthday post a lot has happened again. For that reason I’m going to try to sum that up for you. And don’t worry: I’ll try to keep this birthday post shorter than the last one. 😉

Origins and goals

I started the EERIE project because I wanted to really “get into Linux” instead of only using it. I didn’t know at all where that journey would take me when I set the initial goal to compare Linux desktops. In the first year it was mostly desktop centered posts that I wrote. Besides that I evaluated which Linux distribution would fit my needs, how a live cd is created, etc. In the last few months my interests shifted and wrote about other Unix-like systems as I begun exploring Linux’s “neighbors”.

What has happened in the last year?

In the second year I tried to get back on track and continue with the toolkit tests. But I was soon distracted from it and drawn towards different fields. The new focus clearly was package management, package building and the creation of a Linux distribution.

Since I was pretty confident that I would succeed in putting together an experimental light-weight Linux distribution, I registered a website for it. It has been severely neglected and not received any updates since October… Not having done anything with HTML for about 10 years, using a free template had been an obvious choice to begin with. In the mean time I invested a few hours to learn proper HTML 4.01 and some CSS but I have no idea when I get around to re-design the website. These things are moving forward very slowly.

A short series of posts dealt with the updating of an old Linux distribution where active maintenance had stopped several years ago. It was interesting to do and has been of interest for others, too, since I got a bit more of feedback on that topic.

The most important thing was two distributions that I created: An Arch-like distribution for i586 and one experimental one where I tried to build as many packages as possible using clang, an alternative init system, etc. Both worked quite well and while I never uploaded the i586 work, the other distribution was published as Arch:E5.

In addition to that I’ve got in contact with some nice people and interesting projects which is something I value greatly!

Blog & statistics

The blog’s monthly visitors

As you can see in the picture, the monthly visitors have increased in the second year over the first. In most months I had between 650 and 700 visitors. Exceptions were September with less than 600 hits and October with over 750. The blog has exceeded 10.000 total visitors clearly and features over 30 comments now.

The wordpress Trophy Case

While the wordpress “Trophy Case” is basically just play, I actually like it because it also shows the date of the day when the “medal” was “earned”. This makes the whole thing graphically polished statistics with some actual value.

Hits by country

I’ve had visitors from 114 countries around the earth and thus the white parts on the map are getting fewer and fewer!

Future

I’m having far less time for my computer projects compared to when I started the blog – and I think that really shows. In June I’ve had the lowest monthly hit count since more than one year (at least right now; the month isn’t over yet).

The reason for it is that I’m no longer studying at the university (which gave me enough free time). During the last year I’ve moved to another federal state, sought a job and moved again when I found one. And if my job (as well as the hours that I spend each day to get there and back home again) didn’t mean enough work and time lost, I’ve got even less spare time for another reason. For a positive reason fortunately: The birth of my second child!

So what does that mean? Currently it’s a bit hard to publish at least one new post each month but I’m not willing to retire yet! I just can’t make any promises on exactly what I’ll be able to write about in the forseeable future. Will it be toolkits again? The musl based Arch-like distribution? Some BSD things? Maybe a bit of everything or maybe something entirely different. Who knows? (I don’t!)

New year – looking back at 2013

Happy new year 2014 everybody!

For me the second blogging year has passed and the third one stands at the door. A good opportunity to look back at what 2013 brought!

Last year went by quickly from my perspective. This was due to huge and time-consuming changes in my life. Still I managed to publish 22 posts in the last 12 month – probably not too bad.

Topics

While I had intended to simply continue with the toolkit specific application tests, I chose to open up the blog for more diverse topics. The blogging year started with a series of memory consumption tests of various Qt-based applications. Following Canonical’s announcement of Mir I simply had to write about the Linux desktop again.

Experimenting with various Unix-like systems beside Linux during that time I chose to write about that topic, too. And being an Arch user, it suggests itself to introduce the ArchHurd and ArchBSD projects

Next was an interesting interview with the developer of the FLTK-based Equinox Desktop Environment, just before the Blog’s first birthday post.

The second half of the year started with the first GTK+ application tests. Since there are just so many terminals around which are built upon this toolkit, this was quite a bit of work. For that reason I decided to postpone further GTK+ application tests – and in fact I haven’t had the time for them up to now!

A sample of what elderlinux.org currently looks like

An American programmer got in touch with me and we soon agreed to work together on some projects. This was the initial spark for me to seriously start working on an experimental i586 distribution. Due to it progressing nicely, I registered the domain elderlinux.org which is meant to be the future home of various things related to distribution creation. I hadn’t written any html for more than 10 years and it took me quite some effort to come up with something that doesn’t instantly make your eyes bleed. Unfortunately I don’t have the time to update the page regularly.

I had used ConnochaetOS in the past and was a bit sad to see it shut down. Since I was building an Arch-inspired i586 distro, too, I decided to blog about it before it would vanish. Development of that distribution effectively stopped in 2011 and A LOT has happened since then in the rolling-release world of Arch. This made a journey possible which was more like a time-travel. In a series of three posts I described how such an old system could be (partially) updated to meet today’s standards. I had actually also updated the kernel, bootloader and made the switch from the old init-system to systemd in my VM, but I had forgotten to take screenshots and didn’t find the time to write another post about it, anyway.

While the i586 distribution is generally in a pretty usable shape, the project has already become a bit too big. It currently has repositories worth of several GB of data – and I honestly have no idea how I could share this with others. I was playing around with several other things again, anyway. I decided to put this project on hold when I gave in to the idea of going just one step back: Building something that could be used together with a big distribution (Arch) instead of being completely incompatible with anything but itself. This eventually lead to the creation of Arch:E5 and the last blog post of last year.

A little bit statistics

This kind of retrospect posts wouldn’t be complete without a bit of statistic, would it? So here it comes! Each and every month has surpassed the previous peeks by far. The blog had about 1.000 hits in 2012 – and even if you take into account that I didn’t start to blog before late June, the > 6.600 total hits of 2013 were simply amazing!

The weekly hit statistic on 12/31/2013

The least successful month was January which just barely beat December 2012 with about 320 hits. There was one month (April) which scored a little lower and two which had significantly fewer hits than the previous month. The best one of the year was October with well over 750 hits! The new all-time peak of page hits occurred on 10/11 with 85 in one day!

The monthly hit statistic on 12/31/2013

My blog got even more hits from around the world. However the top countries didn’t change much, so I’ll skip the graphic for it this time. But here’s the map:

Hits by country

Due to the higher variety and new sub-projects some new tags have been added. However these were added to recently to carry much weight.

Tags and categories

Now for some very pleasant changes: I finally started receiving the first comments which are not spam! 😉 And yes, I’m pretty happy about that.

Some comments at last!

For those interested in exact numbers (and to document these statistics for later), here’s a summary:

Monthly and yearly totals

Daily averages

Very suitable for the blog’s first birthday, it was this day that scored four trophies! The trophy case also holds medals for 10 followers and likes now, but I think this little graphic is even nicer:


Four trophies for EERIE on the blog’s birthday

Outlook

So what’s going to come this year? Well, who knows? Honestly: I don’t know. There are three things I intend to dedicate some time to: The GTK+ application tests, the Desktop Demo DVD and of course Arch:E5. But as the past year has shown there’s no chance to know before what exactly will happen. But that’s a good thing actually. So let’s just see what 2014 has in store for all of us!