DDD #1: Situation of the Linux Desktop

It took me a bit longer to write this post (and when I finally did, I forgot to post it to the public). Sorry for that. But now it’s here – and like I promised, it’s introducing a new EERIE subproject!

Situation of the Linux Desktop

No, I don’t want to predict when the “final breakthrough” will happen nor do I care much for current market shares. And no, I’m also not going to repeat what Linus said about this topic – we all know it and if somebody really doesn’t, it’s easy to find out.

To be precise: I don’t mean the situation of the Linux Desktop at all but rather that of the Linux desktop. So – what’s noteworthy here? Well, I can’t put it better than a headline I read in a German magazine quite a while ago: “the desktop is fragmenting / splintering”!

Major desktop environments

Over the years many people have complained that Linux is not “successful” because there’s no standard desktop. There may or may not be something to this claim. The important thing is that it was raised in a time when there were essentially two big DEs which had such a high user base that other desktop environments were only playing underparts. Those two were KDE and GNOME.

Things have changed since then and ironically not in the direction that one of them established itself as the clear “winner”. What happened in fact is more like the contrary…

Forks

First KDE Plasma was released and left a lot of people perplexed. Some didn’t like the new style. Others found the system requirements to be ridiculously high (at that time). People who had used KDE for years were not happy with the direction Plasma was taking and were looking for alternatives. Some changed their default DE, some wanted to go on with KDE 3. Efforts of the later resulted in a new project: Trinity DE!

The other big desktop environment followed the same path; the idea was to modernize things. Some people liked the new GNOME 3, many others hated it (that word is not an exaggeration). The results? Same thing: Some former GNOME users were unhappy and switched their default DE and a few others decided to go on with GNOME 2’s codebase – and thus MATE was born.

Upward climbers

Of course this way DEs that were previously more or less underdogs were getting more and more popular. This is especially the case with Xfce which has been around for quite some time but has attracted many former GNOME 2 users since the release of GNOME 3. Another winner is surely the rather young LXDE: Anybody interested in Linux has at least heard of this light-weight DE today.

Other than that there are more noteworthy players now. First, there’s Unity. It’s one more modern DE that benefits greatly from nowadays being the standard desktop of the extremely popular distro Ubuntu. Another one is Enlightenment which already has a formidable user-base.

Outsiders

Apart from the DEs previously mentioned, new readers of my blog may be surprised just how many other desktop environments there are out there (I’ve blogged about them). Are those inferior to the more popular ones? Hell no!

The biggest problem with them is just that they are not well-known! However there are other problems as well. Many distros (especially the smaller ones) do not offer packages for these. Getting them to run on your distribution can be rather tricky and take some time and effort. In case of novice users it can also prove to be a barrier hard to cross.

The solution

Luckily many DEs offer Live-CDs so that you can easily take a look at them. But having to download multiple ISOs for that reason is also an unnecessary inconvenience. What about a single DVD image that comes with all Linux desktop environments?

This way each of them can be tested easily! It also has the advantages that you won’t miss some less-known DE and that you can compare them directly.

For those reasons I’d like to introduce project “DDD” which stands for “Desktop Demo DVD“!

What’s next?

I’ve already prepared the ISO for the DDD version 0.1. Expect it to be available during the next days!

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