First things first – how I came to Linux (pt. 2)

Welcome back!

Where was I? Right… Windows XP.

Windows XP

When I first saw it, I just thought: “You’ve got to be kidding!” What was this? A blue task bar with a green start button and a terribly colorful background! I still recall what came to my mind next: “Don’t do drugs, man!” Of course, a few seconds later, I had it all set back to classic. Then I attempted to update the system. Guess what? It didn’t work – IE crashed. I tried again, but same thing. Great stuff!

Reboot. What’s this? The desktop is back to ugly! Alright, let’s change it aga… What? It’s still set as “classic”? Wow, if that‘s classic, I don’t know where I’ve been all the years. Let’s set it to “new”. Of course nothing changes. And now back to classic. Ahh, much better. Windows update again? Crash! You know what, buddy? Just go to hell (from where thou must’ve risen)!

Put DOS boot disk in floppy drive, reset. Wait a moment. FDISK.

Yes, that was my first contact with Windows XP. And as you can see, we didn’t really get friends right away… Actually I disliked about everything of this new OS. The exorbitant size when installed, the wasteful usage of RAM, the way it dares to tell me what I wasn’t allowed to do (on my system! Who the heck decides this? Myself – or Micro$oft?), and so on. Not even to talk about forced registration, which is completely unacceptable. M$ got our money and my father used to register every version of Windows with M$ – voluntary. Which is fine. But I was really angry and this was the moment when Redmond begun to lose me, too. I decided to go on with Win2k for as long as possible and then abandon the Windows platform.

Windows 2000 with control panel right after installation: Clean looks.
Freshly installed Windows XP with control panel: Could be called “CandyOS”!

Alternatives?

But where to go then? I had been playing around with FreeDOS and achieved some incredible things (burning CDs in DOS, watching DivX videos on a Pentium 90, browse the net graphically, running Windows applications on DOS, etc.). I liked the system a lot since I knew what every single file on my system was good for and there was not one program or anything there that I didn’t want to have on my drive. But frankly speaking… DOS is not a modern desktop system – especially since drivers are a huge problem and FD-32 seems to go nowhere. It’s very nice for tinkering but not a real alternative.

Meh, Linux…

I had known Linux for a while. That means I had known that it existed. A teacher who tried to get into it himself had founded a “Linux club”. Being interested in computers in general, I had joined it. But while the teacher was trying to get things working, the rest of us typically had Windows running on their machine and played network games or surfed the net. As far as I can remember, we started with SuSE 6.2 back then (SuSE was the most popular distro in Germany at that time). I looked at the system only briefly and found it to be far too complicated. What I disliked most at that time was the case-sensitive file system. I just witnessed it cause trouble all the time.

SuSE favored KDE over GNOME. Being a Windows user at the time I didn’t quite get it how there could be more than one DE and I thought: “If KDE is the standard one, it must be the better one, too.” Fatal thinking! While I liked the bash a lot, I hated KDE. So I decided that Linux wasn’t a choice for my home pc…

At home I had convinced my father that we needed a router pc so that all our pcs could access the internet at the same time. We had another old pc that was just collecting dust anyway but no idea how to set up a machine as a router. Thinking about our club, I proposed Linux. It was allowed to copy it freely after all and I knew that it was perfectly suited for such a task. My father agreed but instead of downloading it for free, he bought SuSE 7.0 Professional. Primarily because of the support option for it as he said.


Our SuSE 7.0 Professional box

It came with kernel 2.2.17, XFree86 4.0, KDE 1.1.2, GNOME 1.2 and StarOffice 5.2!

Thanks to a friend who was a bit into Linux, we managed to get a router up and running. It was painful, though, and took us more than one evening/night of configuration work… But once the server was up, it just worked. And it did so for a very long time. Only after a power outage it refused to boot up again, since the filesystems were reported damaged.

We reorganized our network so that we no longer needed the router pc. I kind of forgot about Linux for quite some time.

Win XP – again

When I bought a new pc, I got a dual-core CPU. Finally I realized that I could not really go on with Win2k anymore. I thought that I had no other option but to install XP. And as I had a legal license for it, anyway, I did. I was never happy with this OS, though and I still consider it a bearable operating system but surely not a decent or even great one.

“Vista”

I heard about this new “Windows Vista” and of course read about it on the net. Now this time I wasn’t angry. “Vista” didn’t even deserve it. It was just plain laughable. Not an OS at all but rather an abomination. This time it was clear that I would never buy it. No sir, I’ve really had it this time! For a while I might stick with XP – but what to do then?

One day when I was really fed up with my Win XP, I decided to give Linux a shot again and see what had happened in the meantime.

Linux!

Everybody was talking about Ubuntu these days. I knew that there were live-CDs and I thought that this was a pretty nice thing that I just had to try out for myself. So I downloaded an Ubuntu image and burned it on a cd. Shortly thereafter the fun started.

It took quite a while to start up, but this was because of the slow cd drive. After it finished loading, I was immediately impressed. Now this was a desktop to my liking! Something way different – but for the better. Very clearly laid out and simple to use. At first I found it strange to have two panels, but I soon liked that, too. I played around with it for a while and for the first time in years, I “felt at home”. It was also great to have Open Office pre-installed just like many other useful programs.

Since I was willing to change anyway, I made a backup of my drives and then installed Ubuntu as a second system. It worked well and I used it more and more often. After finding out how things work and getting replacements for programs I used to work with, I soon booted into Windows just rarely and finally decided to kick it. I also was a bit older now and didn’t consider things like the way the drives are organized “strange” but actually realized that it was superior.

KDE 1 (SuSE 7) – this is what actually prevented me from using Linux in 1999.
GNOME 2 (Ubuntu 8.10) – and this got me back to it!

A lot has happened since then. My beloved GNOME 2.x is dead (save for MATE), Ubuntu has changed for Unity (which I deem unusable on a desktop) and so on. I tried out a lot of distros and desktop environments and learned to live with the big ecosystem that is Linux (GNU/Linux and other software but also the community and the spirit). There’s a mass of things going on – many that I like and some which I don’t like. But this is where you begin to do things your own way, right?

What’s next?

The next entry will have the title: “Eerie’s first ‘e’: ‘elementary’!”.

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